National Conference – Speakers List and Bios

Abele, Frances

Breakout 3D: LCAC $2.5M Partnership Grant: Priorities for Research
Wed. Nov. 15: 10:45am – 12:15pm

Adamek, Kluane

Breakout 4A: Building the Next Generation of Leaders
Wed. Nov. 15: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Kluane Adamek has experience living in rural, urban, northern and southern communities. She is a citizen of the Kluane First Nation and from the Dakl’aweidi- Killer Whale Clan and she loves dancing with the Dakhká Khwáan Dancers, an Inland Tlingit Dance group.  Kluane comes from a diverse background- Indigenous and non-Indigenous- she believes this has given her the ability to view and analyze our world from different perspectives. She has a BA from Carleton, fluent in French and English, and is currently pursuing her MBA in Aboriginal Business and Leadership at Simon Fraser University. Kluane’s professional experience includes work with the Yukon College Board of Governors and Kluane Dana Shaw Corporation; leading education initiatives at the Council of Yukon First Nations; building partnerships with Indigenous communities and all levels of Government for Northwestel; and most notably serving as an advisor to former Assembly of First Nations National Chief Shawn A-in-chut Atleo. Recently Kluane served as a Senior Advisor for the Yukon Territorial, Hon. Pauline Frost, Minister of Health and Social Services, Environment and Housing. Kluane was a Global Shapers with the World Economic Forum and in 2014 chosen as one of 23 ‘Bold Visionaries’ from across the country for the 2014 Bold Vision Leadership Conference.  Kluane is incredibly passionate about supporting youth and emerging leaders in the north and beyond and through her Northern Fellowship she founded and led the development of “Our Voices”, a collective of northern Indigenous emerging leaders and continues to serve as the Co-Chair of exciting new initiative.

Akearok, Jason

Jason Akearok

Executive Director
Nunavut Wildlife Management Board

Breakout 4B: Co-management in Nunavut – unique challenges and opportunities
Wed. Nov. 15: 1:15 – 12:45pm

Jason Akearok was born in Hall Beach, Nunavut. He completed High School in Iqaluit. Mr. Akearok completed his Bachelor of Science in Animal Biology from the University of Alberta in 2004. In 2011, Mr. Akearok completed his Master’s of Biology from Carleton University where he conducted research on the feeding ecology and trophic relationship of three nesting Arctic marine birds through their egg fatty acid and stable isotope profiles. Throughout Mr. Akearok’s post-secondary education, he worked for the Canadian Wildlife Service (CWS) as the Seabird Technician and then, later, the CWS Habitat Biologist. While with the CWS, Mr. Akearok assisted and conducted research on marine birds, conducted Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit knowledge studies on marine birds and sea-ice habitat, managed the CWS Habitat Stewardship Program and the Seabird Program and oversaw a committee tasked with managing CWS’s protected areas. Jason Akearok was appointed as a Board of Director to the Nunavut Wildlife Management Board as the CWS appointee in July 2013. In November 2014, Jason Akearok became the Executive Director for the Nunavut Wildlife Management Board where he continues to oversee the day-to-day operations of the NWMB by working with the staff, NWMB Board of Directors, Inuit, co-management partners and external stakeholders to collaboratively manage Nunavut wildlife through a decision-making model that incorporates western science and Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit.

Aldridge, Jim

Q.C., Partner

Aldridge & Rosling, Vancouver, BC

Plenary 2: Modern Treaties and the Law
Tues. Nov. 14: 9:45 – 10:15am

Breakout 2E: Review of Laws and Policies
Tues. Nov. 14: 3:15 – 4:45pm

Mr. Aldridge is a member of the British Columbia Bar and has been an adjunct professor at the Faculty of Law, University of British Columbia. He has represented the Nisga’a Nation in treaty negotiations since 1980, and was lead counsel during most of that time. He was a member of the legal team representing the Manitoba Métis Federation in its action in respect of Métis land rights under the Manitoba Act. Mr. Aldridge has also represented a number of other clients in the areas of Aboriginal law, immigration, constitutional and administrative law. He enjoys lecturing and teaching and routinely participates in or chairs various committees and conferences in the legal community.

Allen, Edward

Breakout 3D: LCAC $2.5M Partnership Grant: Priorities for Research
Wed. Nov. 15: 10:45am – 12:15pm

Amagoalik, John

Plenary: Indigenous Objectives for Signing Modern Treaties
Tues. Nov. 14: 1o:ooam – 11:15am

John Amagoalik is sometimes referred to as the “founding father” of Nunavut. He was born at a seasonal camp near Inukjuaq in northern Quebec and at the age of five, along with his family, was relocated to Resolute in the High Arctic.  He later attended residential schools in Churchill and Iqaluit, and began his political career as the Baffin Regional Information Officer with the Government of the NWT, a position he left to work on the Inuit land claim. From the mid-1970s he joined others to call for the creation of an Inuit territory, to be called “Nunavut.”  In the 1980s he served as Vice-President and for two terms as President of Inuit Tapirisat of Canada (now Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami). From 1982 to 1985 he was also Co-Chair of the Inuit Committee on National Issues and took part in national constitutional discussions on Aboriginal and treaty rights. He was also Chair of the Nunavut Constitutional Forum from 1986-7 and an advisor to the Tungavik Federation of Nunavut from 1991-93. Following the ratification of Nunavut land claims agreement, and passing of the Nunavut Act, John was appointed Chief Commissioner of the Nunavut Implementation Commission, a body that oversaw the arrangements leading up to Nunavut’s creation in 1999. He has been honoured for his work on Aboriginal rights and the Nunavut claim, including the ITC’s 20th Anniversary Award, a National Aboriginal Achievement Award, and an honorary degree from St. Mary’s University in Halifax, Nova Scotia.

Amos, Amy

Amy AmosExecutive Director
Gwich’in Renewable Resources Board

Plenary: A New Generation of Leaders Reflects on Implementation
Tues. Nov. 14: 11:15 – 12:00pm

Amy Amos is a Nihtat (Inuvik, Northwest Territories (NT)) Participant of the Gwich’in Comprehensive Land Claim Agreement (GCLCA). She is also a Status Indian registered under the Inuvik Native Band. Her mother is Gwich’in and her father is Scottish. Amy was born in Inuvik, NT and raised in Halifax, Nova Scotia with her dad. She had an amazing upbringing, but always had a strong urge to reconnect with the north.

In Halifax, Amy completed a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology at Mount Saint Vincent University (2004) and researched shellfish for Fisheries and Oceans Canada (2000-2005). In January 2006, she moved back to Inuvik to work as a Biologist for the Gwich’in Renewable Resources Board (GRRB), the co-management board responsible for wildlife, fish and forest management in the Gwich’in Settlement Area. In March 2009, she accepted the position of Executive Director with the GRRB. She supervises 5-7 staff and implements Section 12 and 13 of the GCLCA.

In addition to her day job, from 2008 to 2010, Amy was selected as one of three youth advisors to the Arctic Council of Canada. Since 2012, Amy has served as an elected member of the Nihtat Gwich’in Council, the organization responsible for representing the interests of the Nihtat Gwich’in of Inuvik under the GCLCA.

Amy joins us as the young leader of an organization, to share her experiences and perspective on implementing a modern land claim agreement in the north.

Arreak, James

Chief Executive Officer, Nunavut Tunngavik Inc.

Master of Ceremonies

Bachand, Paul

Paul Bachand

Partner
Pape Salter Teillet LLP

Breakout 4C: Land Use Planning: Challenges and Opportunities
Wed. Nov. 15: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Paul Bachand specializes in Indigenous rights, governance and land law. Paul has more than 25 years’ experience providing service to clients across Canada, particularly in the North. In addition to the negotiating of land claim and self government agreements, Paul’s background and experience allow him to fulfill his passion for implementing Indigenous land and self government agreements, advising on land, land registry, governance and legal issues facing First Nations as they exercise their law-making jurisdiction and land administration. Paul has appeared as litigation counsel before a wide variety of administrative tribunals, courts and courts of appeal.

Paul has extensive experience in issues related to lands and land use planning, and as the former Registrar of Land Titles for NWT he oversaw the implementation and registration of the Nunavut Land Claims Agreement land titles, the Sahtu and Gwich’in land titles and engaged with a variety of issues ranging from registration of survey plans to Land Titles Office protocols and implementation of land claim agreements. Paul is also the former Principal Secretary to two premiers of the Northwest Territories and the former Director of the Legal Division for the Government of the Northwest Territories. Paul assisted in the design, development, consultation process and then implementation of the Tlicho Wene’ke – The Tlicho Land Use Plan.

Among the many matters that he has worked on during his career, Paul was legal counsel on the division of the NWT and Nunavut; lead counsel on the Salt River Treaty Land Entitlement Agreement which saw Salt River First Nation in Fort Smith obtain a cash and land settlement, as well as the creation of reserve lands in the community of Fort Smith NWT; lead counsel on a number of land claim and self-government negotiations with a specific focus on lands and governance issues and interaction with land titles office; and Paul played—and continues to play—a key role in the implementation for the Tlicho Government of its Tlicho Final Agreement.

Paul is currently providing legal advice to Nunavut Tunngavik Inc. on devolution issues. Paul has also been involved in the development and implementation of several impact and benefits agreements, been counsel on a number of environmental reviews of mining projects, and, as a partner with Pape Salter Teillet LLP, was integral in developing one of the most advanced First Nation Government Land Use Plans in Canada, on behalf of the Tlicho Government.

Paul received his LL.B from Dalhousie University and is called to the bars of the Northwest Territories, Yukon, British Columbia and Nunavut.

Barry, Ryan

Breakout 4B: Co-management in Nunavut: Challenges and Opportunities
Wed. Nov. 15: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Blanchard, Dominique

Plenary: Deputy Ministers Q&A: Implementing Modern Treaties and the Work of Reconciliation
Wed. Nov. 15: 8:40 – 9:30am

Dominique joined Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) in May 2017 as Assistant Deputy Minister for Public and Indigenous Affairs and Ministerial Services. Prior to her arrival at ECCC, she served as Director of Operations in the Economic and Regional Development Policy Secretariat at the Privy Council Office. Her portfolio included ECCC, Natural Resources, Fisheries and Oceans, Transport, and Agriculture. Previously, Dominique served as Director General of Surface and Intermodal Security and as Chief of Staff to the Deputy Minister at Transport Canada. She has also worked at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada in various policy roles.

Dominique is originally from Manitoba, and is a graduate of Brandon University.

Bosum, Abel

Plenary: The Way Forward: (Indigenous Leaders Panel)
Wed. Nov. 15: 3:15 – 4:15pm

Abel Bosum attended the La Tuque Indian Residential School. He began working for the Cree Nation in 1978 focusing on economic development. From 1984-1998, he was Chief of the Oujé-Bougoumou Cree Nation. After his community’s many forced relocations, he led his people in planning and constructing an innovative new village. Oujé-Bougoumou received international recognition for its community development achievements.

From 1999 to 2017 Abel was the Crees’ Negotiator for Cree-Québec relations. He led negotiations of a New Relationship Agreement between the Cree Nation and Québec which created a path for reconciliation. This Agreement established new standards for the recognition of Indigenous rights.
Abel led negotiations of the Cree-Québec Governance Agreement which increased the Cree Nation’s role in the governance of much of northern Québec, resulted in greater jurisdiction of the Cree Nation over its traditional territory, and gave a voice to all residents of the territory. He has concluded agreements involving health, social services, forestry and mining.

As President of the Aanischaaukamikw Foundation, he raised funds to construct the Aanischaaukamikw Cree Cultural Institute—an award-winning Cree museum.
In 1998, Abel received Canada’s Aboriginal Achievement Award, and in 2016, an honorary Doctor of Civil Law degree from Bishop’s University.
The Cree Nation elected Abel Bosum as Grand Chief in 2017.

Cameron, Kirk

Breakout 2B: The INAC Departmental Split: Implications
Tues. Nov. 14: 3:15 – 4:45pm

Kirk Cameron has worked throughout his career in the area of governance including the creation of Nunavut, Yukon Devolution, Land Claims and Self-government.  As a consultant today, he works closely with Indigenous organizations throughout Canada.

 

Campbell, Alastair

Breakout 1E: Membership and Citizenship
Tues. Nov. 14: 1:15pm – 2:45pm

Alastair Campbell is Senior Planning and Policy Advisor to Nunavut Tunngavik Inc. He has previously worked for the Government of the NWT, the federal government, and the Assembly of First Nations, on issues including land claims agreements and implementation, northern constitutional development, the formation of Nunavut, and economic development in Indigenous communities. He has studied history, anthropology and other social sciences at universities in New Zealand, Canada and Italy.  He has taught occasional courses in anthropology and sociology, and has published some papers in the areas outlined above.

Ronnie CampbellCampbell, Ronnie

Plenary: Modern Treaty Implementation Review Commission (MTIRC)
Wed. Nov. 15: 3:15 – 3:45pm

Ronnie Campbell is a retired Assistant Auditor General of Canada.

Following his arrival in Canada from Scotland in 1976, he worked for the Hudson’s Bay Company in Inuit communities in the eastern Arctic and Cree communities in the James Bay.

He joined the Office of the Auditor General of Canada in 1981 and retired in 2015.  He spent much of his time designing and leading Performance Audits, many of which were focused on programs directed at Indigenous populations both south of 60, and in the 3 territories.

Mr. Campbell has a Commerce Degree from Ottawa University and is a CPA.

Castleden, Heather

Breakout 1D: Roles of Research
Tues. Nov. 14: 1:15 – 2:25pm

Dr. Heather Castleden is a settler scholar, trained as a geographer. She undertakes community-based participatory research in partnership with Indigenous peoples, communities, organizations, and Nations, on their priority issues that fall within her areas of expertise: examining the nexus of cultures, places, power and resistance, as well as relational ethics and decolonizing methodologies. For this work, Dr. Castleden holds the Canada Research Chair in Reconciling Relations for Health, Environments, and Communities, and she is jointly appointment in the Department of Geography and Planning and the Department of Public Health Sciences at Queen’s University. She has been working in partnership with Huu-ay-aht First Nations – a signatory of the Maa-nulth Treaty – on modern treaty-related research since 2005, receiving funding from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

Clark, Micah

Micah Clark

Associate
Aldridge + Rosling LLP

Breakout 3B: The Peel River Case: Implementation Through Litigation
Wed. Nov. 15: 10:45am – 12:15pm

Breakout 4E: Consultation: Case Studies and Lessons Learned
Wed. Nov. 15: 1:15am – 2:45pm

Micah’s practice has a dual focus on modern treaty implementation and Aboriginal/environmental litigation. With respect to treaty implementation, Micah assists treaty governments with the development, drafting and implementation of legislation and government policies. He also provides ongoing advice to treaty governments on issues such as general governance, elections, and the delivery of government programs and services. As part of his litigation practice, Micah has appeared before all levels of court in British Columbia, and has represented clients in Federal Court, the Court of Queen’s Bench for Saskatchewan and the Court of Appeal for Saskatchewan, and the Supreme Court of Canada. He has also successfully represented clients before various administrative tribunals, including the Environmental Appeal Board (British Columbia), and in other dispute resolution proceedings.

Clayton, Eva

President, Nisga’a Lisims Government
Co-Chair Land Claims Agreements Coalition

Coburn, Veldon

Breakout 2B: The INAC Departmental Split: Implications
Tues. Nov. 14: 3:15am – 4:45pm

Veldon Coburn is a PhD candidate at Queens University in the Department of Political Studies. His research focuses on Indigenous policy and politics. He spent over 10 working in the federal public service on Indigenous policy, with nearly 5 years in policy analysis and development at INAC. Veldon is Anishnaabe from Pikwakanagan.

Crooks, Nadine

Plenary: Deputy Ministers Q&A: Implementing Modern Treaties and the Work of Reconciliation
Wed. Nov. 15: 8:40 – 9:30am

Nadine Crookes, Klii?aht’a, is an Ahousaht First Nation member, part of the larger Nuu-chah-nulth Tribe on the West Coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Nadine holds a Master of Arts in Leadership from Royal Roads University.

Since 2001, Nadine has worked for Parks Canada in a variety of capacities and in various functional areas in both field operations and in national policy development. Her current role is Director, Natural Resource Conservation. This team is responsible for providing strategic advice and leadership to assist the Agency in developing natural resource conservation policies, guidance, tools and training. She is the former Director of Parks Canada’s Indigenous Affairs Branch.

Benjamin, Craig

Indigenous Rights Campaigner, Amnesty International

Breakout 2C: International Relations
Tues. Nov. 14: 3:15 – 4:45pm

Breakout 3C: Implementing UNDRIP: Tools or Distractions
Wed. Nov. 15: 10:45am – 12:45pm

Craig Benjamin coordinates Amnesty International’s campaigns in support of the rights of First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples in Canada. A non-Indigenous person currently living in Mi’kmaw territory in Nova Scotia, Craig is honoured to have had the opportunity to work alongside Indigenous activists from across Canada and around the world.

Cruikshank, Ron

Ron Cruikshank

Director
Yukon Land Use Planning Council (YLUPC)

Breakout 4C: Land Use Planning: Challenges and Opportunities
Wed. Nov. 15: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Ron Cruikshank is the Director for the Yukon Land Use Planning Council (YLUPC). He has 27 years of professional planning experience in northern Canada. These included living for 3 years with Chief Hyacinthe Andre in Tsiigehtchic NWT. For 4 years, he was the Senior Land Use Planner/Coordinator for the Gwich’in Land Use Planning Board in the NWT. This work led to the approved Gwich’in Settlement Area Land Use Plan. For the past 17 years, he has assisted and coordinated the implementation of Chapter 11 of the Umbrella Final Agreement, Land Use Planning in the Yukon. This work has included the approved North Yukon Regional Land Use Plan and the controversial Peel Watershed Region Land Use Plan. Through his professional experience, he has become familiar with regional planning under both the Mackenzie Valley Resource Management Act (MVRMA) and the Yukon First Nation Final Agreements. Ron received his Master of Arts (Geography) from the University of Waterloo in 1990.

Dennis, Chief Robert

Breakout 1D: Roles of Research
Tues. Nov. 14: 1:15 – 2:24pm

Doiron, Les

Breakout 1C: Building From a Cultural Foundation
Tues. Nov. 14: 1:15 – 2:25pm

Evic, Leena

Plenary: Indigenous Laws, Ways and Values: Transforming Canada
Wed. Nov. 15: 9:30 – 10:15am

Leena Evic has been an essential voice in Nunavut, articulating a vision for the territory that is grounded fully in Inuit knowledge and wisdom that have been passed along through the centuries. She works to rekindle the sharing of this living legacy between generations of Inuit as the means to building prosperity and wellbeing in the modern Arctic communities of today.

Leena Evic is the founder and President of the Pirurvik Centre, an Inuit-owned company dedicated to Inuit language, culture and wellbeing.  In 2016, she was awarded the Meritorious Service Cross by Canada’s Governor General in recognition of the transformative programs Pirurvik has created since 2003. Pirurvik wide range of programming explores the highest levels of Inuit knowledge; provides literacy and language enhancement to Inuktut speakers and teaches Inuktut as a Second language to younger Inuit and those from outside the culture. Its well-being programs are designed around the specific needs of Inuit men, women and youth. Pirurvik has also been on the leading edge of creating the computing tools that enable Inuktut speakers to use their language in the digital age.  As Pirurvik’s President, but also as an educator, a facilitator and an entrepreneur, Leena shares her experience and inspiration through speaking events in local communities, throughout Nunavut and the rest of Canada, and on the global stage.

Before beginning Pirurvik, Leena was the Director of Social, Cultural and Educational Development with Nunavut Tunngavik, the Inuit organization that signed Canada’s largest land claims agreement.  She was also the Director of Policy for the Department of Justice in the Government of Nunavut that was created in 1999 as part of the land claim.

Inuit approaches to teaching and learning have been important throughout this time, beginning in her early years when she was immersed in the rhythms of traditional Inuit life in Cumberland Sound, near present-day Pangnirtung.  She has built on that foundation through a career as a teacher, a school principal and as an instructor in the Nunavut Teacher Education Program.  She holds a Bachelor’s in Education from McGill University where she also did her Master’s work on educational leadership and culture-based education.

Ferguson, Michael

Michael Ferguson

The Auditor General of Canada
Government of Canada

Wed. Nov. 15
12:40pm – 1:10pm

Michael Ferguson, CPA, CA
FCPA, FCA (New Brunswick)
Auditor General of Canada

Michael Ferguson was appointed Auditor General of Canada on 28 November 2011. Prior to this appointment, he served in a variety of roles in the Government of New Brunswick, including five years as Comptroller, five years as Auditor General of New Brunswick, and one year as Deputy Minister of Finance and Secretary to the Board of Management.

Le vérificateur général du Canada
Michael Ferguson, CPA, CA
FCPA, FCA (Nouveau-Brunswick)
Auditor General of Canada

Michael Ferguson a été nommé vérificateur général du Canada le 28 novembre 2011. Auparavant, il a occupé plusieurs postes au gouvernement du Nouveau-Brunswick, dont le poste de contrôleur pendant cinq ans, le poste de vérificateur général du Nouveau-Brunswick pendant cinq ans aussi, et les postes de sous-ministre des Finances et de secrétaire du Conseil de gestion pendant un an.

Frame, Nuri

BA, LL.B

Partner, Pape Salter Teillet LLP

Breakout 4E: Consultation: Case Studies and Lessons Learned
Wed. Nov. 15: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Nuri Frame is co-managing partner of Pape Salter Teillet LLP. He specializes in Indigenous rights law, with an emphasis on litigation and dispute resolution, governance, and treaty negotiation and implementation. Nuri’s litigation practice focuses on a range of areas impacting Indigenous peoples, including constitutional law, administrative law, environmental and regulatory law, treaty and self-government issues and disputes concerning implementation of impact benefits agreements. Nuri has appeared before numerous courts and regulatory tribunals in both Canada and the United States. Nuri appeared before the Supreme Court of Canada on behalf of interveners in the Behn, Keewatin, and Chippewas of the Thames cases.

In addition to his litigation practice, Nuri also provides advice on a range of other legal issues affecting Indigenous communities, including governance, treaty negotiation and implementation, environmental and resource protection and negotiation and consultation with governments and resource developers. Nuri has worked extensively with Indigenous governments in Ontario, Alberta, British Columbia, Yukon and the Northwest Territories. In his practice, Nuri aims to provide his clients with legal and strategic advice that permits them to access the full range of options available for effectively resolving the issues they are presented with.

Prior to joining Pape Salter Teillet, Nuri practiced as a litigator in the New York office of Sullivan & Cromwell LLP, where he worked on a broad range of complex corporate and commercial litigation matters.

Nuri received his LL.B from Osgoode Hall Law School, where he was awarded the Bronze Medal, and is called to the bar in Ontario, Yukon, the Northwest Territories and New York State.

Nuri is consistently recognized as a leading practitioner in the field of Aboriginal law in the peer rankings published by Lexpert Magazine and has been repeatedly named a “Best Lawyer” in the area of Aboriginal law by the peer rankings in Best Lawyers in Canada. Best Lawyers in Canada named Nuri the 2018 “Lawyer of the Year” for Aboriginal Law in Toronto.

Giles, Audrey

Breakout 4D: Finding and Measuring Wellbeing
Wed. Nov. 15: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Golshan, Sahar

Breakout 4A: Building the Next Generation of Leaders
Wed. Nov. 15: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Sahar Golshan is a young person of mixed ancestry from Chinese and Iranian origins living in Tkaronto, Dish with One Spoon Territory. She is honoured  to have the opportunity to collaborate with Indigenous and non-Indigenous youth who commit themselves to social justice on Turtle Island. She is inspired by young people who challenge themselves and their communities to engage in conversations about the history, reality and possibility of this land. Before joining the CRE team as a volunteer and then a staff member, she has coordinated educational programming alongside young people of diverse identities in both Canada and in international communities with Canada World Youth and the Ontario Council for International Cooperation. She is also passionate about learning languages and writing creative non-fiction.

Greenland-Morgan, Grand Chief Bobbie Jo

Grand Chief Bobbie Jo Greenland-Morgan

President, Gwich’in Tribal Council

Plenary: The Way Forward (Indigenous Leaders Panel)
Wed. Nov. 15: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Born in Inuvik raised in Aklavik. Bobbie Jo Greenland Morgan has mixed ancestry including Gwich’in, Dene, Inuvialuit and Scottish. She identifies closely with her Gwich’in roots which includes Ehdiitat, Vuntut, Gwichya and Tetlit Gwich’in. Husband Wyatt Morgan originates from the Trondek Hwechin First Nation of Dawson City, Yukon and together they have one daughter, Elisha, who is 8. Bobbie Jo holds a diploma from Yukon College in First Nations Management Studies (1997), and attended the First Nations University of Canada in 2000 in the Environmental Science Program. She then entered the Circumpolar Young Leaders Internship Program in Copenhagen Denmark for 6 months and worked directly on issues facing indigenous people in the Arctic.

Bobbie Jo worked for a variety of organizations including public and aboriginal governments, gaining experience with the Government of the Northwest Territories, the Beaufort-Delta Education Council, the Gwich’in Renewable Resource Board, the Mackenzie Gas Project and the Yukon Government. She served the Hamlet of Aklavik as an elected council member and has sat on various boards and committees including Gwich’in Council International, Gwich’in Renewable Resources Board, GNWT Income Support Appeal Board, GNWT Education Renewal Communication Advisory, Porcupine Caribou Management Board, and the GTC Education and Training Committee.

When not in the office, Bobbie Jo enjoys spending time with her family outdoors, camping, picking berries, and being out on the beautiful land we are so fortunate to have.

Greer, Alan

Breakout 3A: Lessons Learned from the Collaborative Fiscal Policy Development Process
Wed. Nov. 15: 10:45am – 12:15pm

Gunn, Brenda

Breakout 3C: Implementing UNDRIP: Tools or Distractions
Wed. Nov. 15: 10:45am – 12:45pm

Brenda L. Gunn, Assistant Professor Robson Hall Faculty of Law. She has a B.A. from the University of Manitoba and a J.D. from the University of Toronto.  She completed her LL.M. in Indigenous Peoples Law & Policy at the University of Arizona. She articled with Sierra Legal Defence Fund (now Ecojustice Canada). She was called to the bars of Law Society of Upper Canada and Manitoba. Brenda also worked at a community legal clinic in Rabinal, Guatemala on a case of genocide submitted to the Inter-American Commission of Human Rights. She has also worked with First Nations on Aboriginal and treaty rights issues in Manitoba. As a proud Metis woman she continues to combine her academic research with her activism pushing for greater recognition of Indigenous peoples’ inherent rights as determined by Indigenous peoples’ own legal traditions. Her current research focuses on promoting greater conformity between international law on the rights of Indigenous peoples and domestic law.  She continues to be actively involved in the international Indigenous peoples’ movement, regularly attending international meetings, including the review of Canada before CERD.  She provided technical assistance to the UN Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in the analysis and drafting of the report summarizing the responses on the survey on implementing the UN Declaration.   She developed a handbook on understanding and implementing the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples that is quickly becoming one of the main resources in Canada on the UN Declaration (http://www.indigenousbar.ca/pdf/undrip_handbook.pdf) and has delivered workshops on the Declaration across Canada and internationally.  In 2013, she participated in the UNITAR Training Programme to Enhance the Conflict Prevention and Peacemaking Capacities of Indigenous Peoples’ Representatives, which continues to impact her research.

Harris, Nancy

Breakout 3A: Lessons Learned from the Collaborative Fiscal Policy Development Process
Breakout 3E: Four Federal Legislative Reviews to Watch
Wed. Nov. 15: 10:45am – 12:15pm

Nancy Harris is Executive Director of Regulatory Stewardship and Aboriginal Affairs at Transport Canada.  Nancy has a Masters degree in Economics with a specialization in natural resource management and has close to 25 years of experience in the federal Public Service.  Nancy joined Transport Canada in July 2010 as the Director of Aboriginal Affairs.  In spring 2013, management of the Navigation Protection Program was added to Nancy’s responsibilities.

Hill, Diane

Breakout 4A: Building the Next Generation of Leaders
Wed. Nov. 15: 1:15 – 2:45 pm

Diane Hill is from the Oneida Nation of the Thames First Nations community. She is from the bear clan, and her spirit name is Kayatuhe which means someone who writes. She currently resides in Tkaronto, dish with one spoon treaty territory and previously has resided in her home community. She joined the Tkaronto Youth Reconciliation Initiative because she was very interested in learning more about Canadian Roots Exchange overall. Previously she had attended the national youth conference in Winnipeg. This really inspired her to connect with youth across Turtle Island, and to build solidarity amongst various nations, both Indigenous and non-Indigenous and made her feel like there was a vision and mandate she could contribute to. This work is especially important to her because it helps her to heal, educate and learn concurrently, and create a strong sense of cultural identity for herself. She aspires to be a role model and mentor for Indigenous youth and young people, and to be a community educator on our collective histories and people as a means to inspire change, hope, resiliency and decolonization. She is very passionate about advocating for her community and connecting with people in hopes to make meaningful reciprocal relationships with the qualities of peace, friendship and trust.

Hutchins, Peter

Lawyer, Hutchins Legal Inc.

Breakout 1C: Building From a Cultural Foundation
Tues. Nov. 14: 1:15 – 2:25pm

During his forty years of practice devoted exclusively to Aboriginal peoples, Peter Hutchins has been involved extensively in negotiation, litigation, counsel and special advisor work for First Nations and Inuit across Canada as well as non-Aboriginal Governments. His litigation experience includes numerous appearances before the Supreme Court of Canada, the Federal Courts of Canada, the courts of Quebec, Ontario, British Columbia, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Newfoundland, the Northwest Territories, as well as the United Nations Human Rights Committee (as it then was) and the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights.

Mr. Hutchins has developed treaty negotiation positions involving historic, contemporary – including intensive work on the James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement – and international treaties and implementation measures on a full range of issues including Aboriginal rights and title, human rights, environmental, constitutional and international law for Aboriginal communities throughout Canada. He has extensive experience in treaty and legislative drafting and has advised the Federal and Territorial governments on Aboriginal governance and treaty implementation issues.

Mr. Hutchins has served as Special Advisor on Aboriginal Self-Government to the Canadian Minister of Indian Affairs. During the Crown/Mohawk crisis of 1990 in Quebec, he acted as special envoy for the National Chief and subsequently as counsel for the Chief Negotiator for the Mohawk community of Kanesatake. He was also legal adviser to the Aboriginal members of the Canadian delegation negotiating amendments to the 1916 Migratory Birds Convention.

In 1980, Mr. Hutchins introduced the Aboriginal Peoples and the Law course at McGill University Faculty of Law which he taught through to 1996. He has written extensively and appears regularly as guest lecturer, chair and panellist addressing Aboriginal, constitutional, environmental and international law issues. In the Fall of 2012, he was awarded the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal in recognition of his contribution to Canada and his work on behalf of the indigenous peoples of Canada. Peter W. Hutchins received his LL.L. from Laval University and an LL.M. in international law from the London School of Economics. He is a member of the Barreau du Quebec and the Law Society of Ontario.

Hooker, Jane

Jane Hooker

Breakout 2C: International Relations
Tues. Nov. 14: 3:15 – 4:45pm

Currently on leave from the New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade, Jane Hooker is a career diplomat and international lawyer, having worked at senior levels on a wide range of policy and legal issues. Jane has significant experience in international trade law, including serving as legal counsel for bilateral and regional trade negotiations. She led a team of lawyers responsible for environmental and law of the sea issues, and has expertise on defence and security cooperation, as well as human rights issues. Jane has undertaken a posting to the New Zealand Embassy in The Hague, the Netherlands. She has law and arts degrees from the University of Canterbury (New Zealand).

Irlbacher-Fox, Stephanie

Stephanike Irlbacher-Fox

Adjunct Research Professor
Carleton University School of Public Policy and Administration

Breakout 2A: Communicating and Understanding Treaties: Responsibilities of Generations to Come
Tues. Nov. 14: 3:15 – 4:45pm

Breakout 3D: LCAC $2.5M Partnership Grant: Priorities for Research
Wed. Nov. 15: 10:45am – 12:15pm

Based in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Stephanie is Adjunct Research Professor with the University of Carleton School of Public Policy and Administration. Through her company, Fox Consulting Ltd., she is an independent scholar, and works as an advisor to Indigenous governments on self government and Treaty negotiations, and related implementation. She was the Implementation Director who led the technical set-up of the Deline Got’ine Government after working as an advisor on the Deline self government negotiations for 13 years. She is the author of Finding Dahshaa: Self Government, Social Suffering and Aboriginal Policy in Canada (UBC Press, 2009), and is the Principal Investigator of the $2.5M LCAC-Carleton University Modern Treaty Implementation Research Project.

Jack, John

Jack John

Member of Council for Huu-ay-aht First Nations,
Director and Chair for Alberni-Clayoquot Regional District

Plenary: The Way Forward (Indigenous Leaders Panel)
Wed. Nov. 15: 1:15 – 2:45pm

JOHN ALAN JACK is thirty-six years old. He lives in the Oceanside area of Vancouver Island in British Columbia with his wife and daughter. John is a third-term elected Member of Council with the Huu-ay-aht First Nations, and its representative to the Alberni-Clayoquot Regional District. He was appointed to be chair of the regional district in December of 2016, the first representative of a voting-member First Nation to do so in British Columbia. He has a deep passion for reconciliation between the Crown and indigenous peoples, especially in methods of enabling mutually-beneficial economic and natural resource development.

Joanas, Dustin

Breakout 4A: Building the Next Generation of Leaders
Wed. Nov. 15: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Student at Nunavut Sivuniksavut

Johnson, Dillon

Johnson Dillon

Associate
Temixw Planning Ltd.

Plenary: A New Generation of Leaders Reflects on Implementation
Tues. Nov. 14: 11:15am – 12:00pm

Dillon is from the Tla’amin Nation, where he served as an elected councillor for 6 years. He has been providing community and financial planning advice and services to First Nations communities for the past decade with Temixw Planning Ltd. out of North Vancouver, BC. He is an MBA graduate from the University of Western Ontario and holds the Certified Aboriginal Financial Manager (CAFM) designation from the Aboriginal Financial Officers Association of Canada. He also serves as Vice-President for the Aboriginal Financial Officers Association of BC.

Joseph, Chief Roberta

Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in

Breakout 3B: The Peel River Case: Implementation Through Litigation
Wed. Nov. 15: 10:45am – 12:15pm

Roberta Joseph was elected as Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in Chief in October, 2014, she is presently serving her second term. Chief Joseph had previously served two terms on the Tr’ondek Hwech’in (TH) Council as Deputy Chief, Councillor and held Portfolios for Deputy Chief, Implementation, Education, Health and Social and Human Resources and Employment and Training.

Prior to being Chief, she spent the past 25 years working for First Nations; most recently, employed in the TH Fish and Wildlife branch as the TH Fish and Wildlife Manager and Coordinator. She worked for Council of Yukon First Nations as the Director of Finance and Administration, Supervisor of finance, and a variety of other finance department positions. Through these opportunities, she was inspired by Yukon First Nation Elders and leaders who instilled in her the importance of the land claims negotiations, self-government and the protection of First Nation’s rights, interests, cultural and heritage values.

Additionally, Chief Joseph has committed numerous years to various Boards and Committees such as Porcupine Caribou Management Board, Tr’ondek Hwech’in Trust, Tr’ondek Hwech’in Justice Administration Committee, etc.

Chief Joseph is a committed to advocate for the protection of inherent rights, climate change, and building a positive, healthy and economical community. She is a strong supporter of her Nation’s cultural aspirations and is a member of the Tr’ondek Hwech’in Hän Singers and actively participates or volunteers at many community culture initiatives throughout Tr’ondek Hwech’in traditional territory.

Kalluk, Nathaniel

Breakout 4B: Co-management in Nunavut – unique challenges and opportunities
Wed. Nov. 15: 1:15 – 12:45pm

Nathaniel Kalluk is a member of Qausuittuq Park Management Committee (QPMC), a joint Inuit/Government Park planning and management committee.  Along with other QPMC members, Nathaniel’s role is to ensure effective cooperative management of the Park by Inuit and Parks Canada by providing advice in matters related to Park management, including Park management planning.  Nathaniel grew up in Resolute Bay, second most northern community in Nunavut, and also the closest one to the park.  His knowledge of the area, traditions and culture are invaluable assets to Qausuittuq Park Management Committee.

King, Hayden

Breakout 3D: LCAC $2.5M Partnership Grant: Priorities for Research
Wed. Nov. 15: 10:45am – 12:15pm

Hayden King is from Beausoleil First Nation on Gchi’mnissing in Huronia, Ontario. Hayden is the director of the Centre for Indigenous Governance at Ryerson University, an adjunct professor at Carleton University and a Senior Fellow at Massey College.

Kotierk, Aluki

President Nunavut Tunngavik Inc.
Co-Chair, Land Claims Agreements Coalition

Diana Kwan

Breakout 3C: Implementing UNDRIP: Tools or Distractions
Wed. Nov. 15: 10:45am – 12:45pm

Diana is a Senior Counsel at Justice Canada. Originally from Edmonton and a graduate of the University of Alberta, she has nearly 20 years of experience in the Aboriginal area. Her experience has covered almost all dimensions of practice including private sector representation of Indigenous individuals and First Nations at various levels of court, international experience, representation of the federal Crown in land claims, and fulfilling an intermediary role between First Nations and the federal Crown. She has a multi-disciplinary perspective that combines history, culture, policy and law in a complex and continuously evolving area, with a view to providing forward thinking advice as a trusted advisor. Currently, Diana is a member of Justice’s Review of Laws and Policies Secretariat, providing advice at the intersection of law and policy to support the Government’s commitment to a renewed nation to nation relationship with Indigenous peoples.

Land, Lorraine

Lorraine Land

Partner
Olthuis Kleer Townshend

Breakout 3C: Implementing UNDRIP: Tools or Distractions
Wed. Nov. 15: 10:45am – 12:45pm

Lorraine Land is a partner at Olthuis Kleer Townshend, one of Canada’s leading firms in the area of Aboriginal law. She regularly advises Aboriginal clients, and appears before Courts and tribunals, on Aboriginal land rights and claims, Aboriginal consultation issues, impacts and benefits agreements, energy project reviews, and environmental matters. Her work includes assistance to clients in modern claims regions, including land claim implementation and self-government implementation.

Lorraine has a Masters of Environmental Studies (with a concentration on Aboriginal co-management regimes), and a Certificate in Alternative Dispute Resolution. Prior to re-joining OKT in 2009, Lorraine was Legal Counsel and the Acting Director of Legal Services for the Government of Nunavut.

Lorraine is recipient of the Gold Key Alumni Award from Osgoode Hall Law School, for exceptional contributions to the legal profession and society, and accomplishment in the field of law. She is a member of the Ontario, Northwest Territories and Nunavut bars. Lorraine also teaches a course entitled Aboriginal Peoples and Resource Development for Osgoode Law School’s Professional Development Program.  She is listed as a “frequently recommended” lawyer in the Lexpert Directory.

Langlois, Jeff

Jeff Langlois

Breakout 4E: Consultation: Case Studies and Lessons Learned
Wed. Nov. 15: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Jeff Langlois provides strategic advice and representation to First Nations engaged in litigation, negotiations and consultations to protect and advance his clients’ Aboriginal and Treaty rights. Jeff acts for First Nations in a broad range of matters, including constitutional litigation, environmental assessments and engagement with the Crown and businesses relating to diverse areas such as land use planning, oil and gas, mining, hydroelectric development and the implementation of land claims agreements.

Jeff has appeared before the Supreme Court of Canada, all levels of Court in British Columbia and Yukon, as well as the Alberta Court of Queen’s Bench, the Ontario Court of Appeal and the Federal Court. His practice includes clients in British Columbia, Yukon, the Northwest Territories, Alberta and Saskatchewan. Prior to joining JFK Law, Jeff practiced at a national law firm in Vancouver where he represented First Nations and businesses in a broad range of contexts, including aboriginal law, commercial litigation, insolvency and dispute resolution.

Laurendeau, Hélène

Breakout 2B: The INAC Departmental Split: Implications
Tues. Nov. 14: 3:15 – 4:45pm

 

 

 

Leung, Sashia

Associate Director

B.C. Treaty Commission

Breakout 4A: Building the Next Generation of Leaders
Wed. Nov. 15: 1:15am – 2:45pm

Sashia Leung is proud to be both Wet’suwet’en and Chinese, from Wiset (Moricetown), BC. She is a strong advocate for the rights of Indigenous peoples and has focused her academic and professional work on advancing reconciliation and nation-building. Sashia holds a BA in Political Science with a concentration in First Nations studies from the University of British Columbia.

Sashia is Associate Director of Process for the BC Treaty Commission. She facilitates treaty negotiations, organizes forums, and leads special projects including: First Nations governance initiatives, ratification processes, communications, and community engagement. Sashia also assists with nation-to-nation engagement on First Nations overlap and shared territory discussions. Sashia has worked at the international level for the past four years at the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Rights, supporting the UNPFII Expert Members.

Sashia is a 2017 member of the Governor General’s Canadian Leadership Conference, and serves on the Executive Board for the Nicola Valley Institute of Technology and on the Big Brothers Greater Vancouver Charity Board.

Lloyd, Georgina

Breakout 3C: Implementing UNDRIP: Tools or Distractions
Wed. Nov. 15: 10:45am – 12:45pm

Loth-Bown, Christine

Plenary: Deputy Ministers Q&A: Implementing Modern Treaties and the Work of Reconciliation
Wed. Nov. 15: 8:40 – 9:30am

Christine Loth-Bown was appointed Vice President of the Policy Development Sector in April 2016. Reporting to the President, Christine is responsible for legislative, regulatory and policy elements of environmental assessment. Prior to joining the Agency, Christine was the Director General of Ecosystems Management at Fisheries and Oceans Canada.

Christine has over 21 years of experience in policy development and program implementation. Holding senior roles at the Canadian Tourism Commission (CTC) and Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO), Christine has led the development of strategic policy initiatives, and corporate planning frameworks including: the policy changes to the Fisheries Protection Program; the 2007-2011 and 2008-2012 Corporate Plans for the CTC and the 2005-2010 Strategic Plan for DFO. She has also managed and coordinated a number of federal horizontal policy frameworks including Canada’s Oceans Strategy and Gathering Strength: Canada’s Aboriginal Action Plan.

Christine holds a Master of Arts in Canadian Studies from Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario and a Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Canadian Studies and Political Science from Glendon College, York University, Toronto, Ontario. She lives in Ottawa with her husband and son.

__________________________________________________

Christine Loth-Bown a été nommée vice-présidente du secteur de l’Élaboration des politiques en avril 2016. Relevant du président, Christine est responsable des aspects législatifs, réglementaires et politiques de l’évaluation environnementale. Avant de se joindre à l’Agence, Christine était directrice générale de la Gestion des écosystèmes à Pêches et Océans Canada.

Christine possède plus de 21 ans d’expérience dans les domaines de l’élaboration de politiques et de la mise en oeuvre de programmes. Alors qu’elle occupait des postes supérieurs à la Commission canadienne du tourisme et à Pêches et Océans Canada, Christine a dirigé l’élaboration d’initiatives de politiques stratégiques et de cadres de planification intégrée, dont les modifications de politiques du Programme de protection des pêches; les plans d’entreprise 2007-2011 et 2008-2012 de la Commission canadienne du tourisme et le plan stratégique 2005-2010 de Pêches et Océans Canada. Elle a aussi géré et coordonné plusieurs cadres stratégiques horizontaux du gouvernement fédéral, y compris la Stratégie sur les océans du Canada et Rassembler nos forces : le plan d’action du Canada pour les questions autochtones.

Christine est détentrice d’une maîtrise ès arts en études canadiennes de l’Université Carleton, à Ottawa, et un baccalauréat ès arts (avec distinction) en études canadiennes et en science politique du Collège Glendon de l’Université York, à Toronto. Elle vit à Ottawa avec son mari et son fils.

MacDonald, Allan

Breakout 1B: Consent and Consultation
Tues. Nov. 14: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Madden, Jason

Jason Madden

Co-Managing Partner
Pape Salter Teillet LLP

Breakout 1E: Membership and Citizenship
Tues. Nov. 14: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Jason is co-managing partner of Pape Salter Teillet LLP, a boutique law firm with offices in Toronto and Vancouver that exclusively represents First Nation, Inuit and Métis communities and governments across Canada. He is a graduate of Osgoode Hall Law School and called to the bar in Ontario, Alberta, the Northwest Territories and the Yukon. Jason’s practice is primarily focused on litigation in relation to Aboriginal rights and jurisdictions, the negotiation and implementation of modern day treaties and self-government agreements as well as consultation and accommodation issues. He has appeared before all levels of court from Ontario westward, including, the Supreme Court of Canada. He also regularly appears before administrative and regulatory bodies on behalf of his Indigenous clients.

Jason is also recognized as being at the forefront in the advancement of Métis law in Canada. He has appeared before the Supreme Court of Canada in all of the cases dealing with Métis rights issues over the last decade, including, the recent Daniels case. He has been counsel in a majority of the cases dealing with Métis harvestings right from Ontario westward since 2003. He is currently counsel for the Manitoba Metis Federation in their negotiations with Canada to implement the Supreme Court of Canada’s 2013 decision bearing the Federation’s name and acts as counsel for the Métis Nation of Ontario and Métis Nation of Alberta in their recently established exploratory discussions processes with Canada. Jason is a regular speaker and presenter at educational institutions and conferences on Aboriginal legal issues generally and Métis law specifically. He was recognized as one of the 25 Most Influential Lawyers in Canada by Canadian Lawyer Magazine in 2014 and is the 2015 recipient of Osgoode Hall Law School’s Dianne Martin Medal for Social Justice through Law. He is also recognized by his peers as a leading practioner in Aboriginal law by Lexpert (“most frequently recommended”) and Chambers & Partners.

Jason is Métis and was born and raised in northwestern Ontario. He is a descendant of the ‘Halfbreeds of Rainy Lake and River’ who collectively adhered to Treaty #3 in 1875.

Mehaffey, Matt

Breakout 3D: LCAC $2.5M Partnership Grant: Priorities for Research
Wed. Nov. 15: 10:45am – 12:15pm

 

Mike, Shuvinai

Breakout 4D: Finding and Measuring Wellbeing
Wed. Nov. 15: 1:15 – 2:45pm

B.Ed, M.Ed

Director of Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit, Government of Nunavut

Shuvinai Mike was Born and raised in Iqaluit, Nunavut. Her passion was to teach in her own language & culture, after 24 years as an educator, she began working with Department of Culture & Heritage in 2004 as Director of Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit. Among many projects focused on Inuit knowledge, she facilitates the Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit Katimajiit elders from across Nunavut, an advisory board to the Government of Nunavut about Inuit (isumausingit) ways of doing things and knowledge and its applicability into the government services.

 

 

Miller, Jim

Jim Miller

PhD, OC, SOM, FRSC
Professor Emeritus of History
University of Saskatchewan

Plenary: The Story of Indigenous-Crown Relations
Tues. Nov. 14: 9:00 – 9:45am

Jim Miller received a B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. (History) from the University of Toronto. Formerly the Canada Research Chair in Native-Newcomer Relations, he is now Professor Emeritus of History, University of Saskatchewan. A specialist in historical and contemporary issues related to Aboriginal peoples, his research and publications have focused on policy issues. The major works include a survey history of Native-newcomer history, Skyscrapers Hide the Heavens; a history of residential schooling, Shingwauk’s Vision: A History of Native Residential Schools; and a history of treaty-making, Compact, Contract, Covenant: A History of Aboriginal Treaty-Making. His book on reconciliation, Residential Schools and Reconciliation, was published by the University of Toronto Press on October 3.

His scholarly work has received numerous awards: Fellowship in the Royal Society of Canada (1998), the Gold Medal for Achievement in Research of the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (2010), Saskatchewan Order of Merit (2013), the Killam Prize for the Humanities awarded by The Canada Council (2014), and selection as an Officer of the Order of Canada (2014).

Miller lives in Saskatoon with his wife, Dr. Lesley Biggs.

Mugford, Julie

Breakout 1D: Roles of Research
Tues. Nov. 14: 1:15 – 2:24pm

Nelson, Rodney

Rodney Nelson

PhD, C.Dir., PAED, CAPA

Breakout 2D: Data: Needs, Uses, Tools, Technologies
Tues. Nov. 14: 3:15 – 4:45pm

An Indigenous community advocate and governance leader, Rodney is an advocate for economic development for Indigenous communities’ world wide and is passionate about retaining traditional knowledge. He is a professor at Carleton University and the current CEO and Principal of Governance for the Global Governance Group and an instructor at AFOA Canada. His interests include; governance, economic development, education, ethics and traditional knowledge.

Rodney’s PhD is in Indigenous/Canadian Studies (Carleton/ Trent) and holds a Master’s degree in anthropology and two Bachelor degrees in psychology and anthropology. He is a chartered Director from the Degroote School of Business, Certified Aboriginal Professional Administrator (CAPA), and a Professional Aboriginal Economic Developer (PAED). Rodney is Anishinabe and lives in Ottawa with his wife Dacia and two children. He is active in the community as a traditional teacher, fire keeper and musician.

Orkin, Jessica

Breakout 1B: Consent and Consultation
Tues. Nov. 14: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Breakout 3D: LCAC $2.5M Partnership Grant: Priorities for Research
Wed. Nov. 15: 10:45am – 12:15pm

Jessica Orkin is a partner at Goldblatt Partners LLP in Toronto. She has a broad litigation practice including civil, criminal and administrative law matters, with an emphasis on constitutional, Aboriginal rights, human rights, and access to information law matters. Jessica participates in the work of the Land Claims Agreements Coalition on behalf of the Grand Council of the Crees (Eeyou Istchee).

Papillon, Martin

Breakout 1B: Consent and Consultation
Tues. Nov. 14: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Breakout 3D: LCAC $2.5M Partnership Grant: Priorities for Research
Wed. Nov. 15: 10:45am – 12:15pm

Peters, Derek

Head Chief (Tayii Ḥaw̓ił)

Breakout 1D: Roles of Research
Tues. Nov. 14: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Piercey, Angela

Breakout 4B: Co-management in Nunavut – unique challenges and opportunities
Wed. Nov. 15: 1:15 – 12:45 pm

Angela Piercey was born and raised in Resolute Bay. She enjoys spending time on the land hunting, fishing, camping and sharing those experiences with her friends and family. Bathurst Island, location of Qausuittuq National Park, was practically her backyard growing up. Angela was happy to learn that her backyard has been protected and was excited to join Qausuituq National Park team 10 months ago as Park Manager Trainee. Together with the support of the Qausuittuq Park Manager and the rest of the Nunavut Field Unit, Angela is working towards becoming the next park manager.

Piercey, Chris

Breakout 3E: Four Federal Legislative Reviews to Watch
Wed. Nov. 15: 10:45am – 12:15pm

Chris Piercey is the Team Lead of the National Energy Board (NEB) Modernization Secretariat at Natural Resources Canada, which supports the Minister of NRCan’s mandate to Modernize the National Energy Board to ensure that its composition reflects regional views and has sufficient expertise in fields such as environmental science, community development, and Indigenous traditional knowledge. Before leading the NEB Modernization Secretariat Chris was a Deputy Director in the Pipelines, Natural Gas and Liquefied Natural Gas Division at NRCan from 2009 – 2016 where he was responsible for providing policy advice and analysis on issues related to oil and gas markets and infrastructure development. Prior to entering into the Federal Government Chris spent over 10 years working in the oil and gas, and engineering sector in Newfoundland.

Chris Holds a Bachelors degree in Engineering Technology and a Master’s degree in Business Administration.

Potts, Robert

Robert Potts

Partner
Blaney McMurtry LLP

Plenary: The Spirit and Intent of Modern Treaties
Tues. Nov. 14: 10:45 – 11:15am

Breakout 1A: Negotiation Processes and Ensuring Community Support
Tues. Nov. 14: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Robert (Bob) Potts chairs the firm’s Aboriginal Law Group. He has actively represented and counselled First Nations since the early 1980’s, and has successfully negotiated a number of land claim settlements in Ontario and Alberta. Bob has been voted by his peers for inclusion in The Best Lawyers in Canada® in the Aboriginal Law category for the last 8 years, and is also rated by Lexpert® Canadian Legal Directory as a Leading Practitioner (repeatedly recommended) in Aboriginal Law. Bob regularly participates in conferences and delivers papers on Aboriginal Law issues. He spoke at the 2012 Commonwealth Lawyers Association Property Law Conference in Belfast, Ireland on the subject of “Indigenous Peoples and Land Issues”. In September 2007, he was a speaker at the Annual Commonwealth Law Conference held in South Africa, on “Aboriginal Claims in Canada”. He has chaired seminars and lectured at the Ontario Bar Association, The Law Society of Upper Canada – Continuing Legal Education, and the Canadian Institute on commercial and litigation practice issues including class action proceedings. Bob is on the Faculty of the Osgoode Hall Law School Certificate in Fundamentals of Aboriginal Law program. Bob is a past director of The Advocates’ Society and has been published in The Advocates’ Quarterly, the National Real Property Law Review, and the Canadian Independent Adjuster.

Pratt, Alan

Alan Pratt Law Firm, Dunrobin, Ontario

Breakout 1E: Membership and Citizenship
Tues. Nov. 14: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Alan Pratt has served First Nation clients on land claims and other issues since 1984. He has handled litigation on behalf of First Nations and other clients at every level of court, including the Supreme Court of Canada. His practice focuses on Aboriginal and treaty rights and land claims based on those rights. He also provides a broad range of advice for Chiefs and Councils and other First Nation organizations, including the Assembly of First Nations. He has been directly involved in the settlement of numerous specific claims, bringing hundreds of millions of dollars in compensation in land and cash to his clients. He has also testified to the Standing Committees of the House of Commons and the Senate on specific claims reform and is a frequent speaker at conferences on specific claims and other topics relating to the law and First Nations.  He is currently counsel to the Algonquins of Ontario and the Akaitcho Dene First Nations (Northwest Territories) relating to modern treaty making and treaty implementation and continues to serve other First Nation clients in relation to claim negotiation, litigation and reconciliation initiatives.

Rabesca Zoe, Bertha

Breakout 3A: Lessons Learned from the Collaborative Fiscal Policy Development Process
Wed. Nov. 15: 10:45am – 12:15pm

Restoule, Karen

Breakout 4A: Building the Next Generation of Leaders
Wed. Nov. 15: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Robert, Mélanie

Breakout 2D: Data: Needs, Uses, Tools, Technologies
Tues. Nov. 14: 3:15 – 4:45pm

Mélanie Robert is the Executive Director of Services and Open Government at the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS).  She leads the Government of Canada’s efforts to be more open, transparent and accountable and to manage information as effectively as possible.

Mélanie Robert est directrice générale, Services et du Gouvernement ouvert du Secrétariat du Conseil du Trésor du Canada (SCT). Elle dirige les efforts du gouvernement du Canada visant à améliorer l’ouverture, la transparence et la responsabilisation et à gérer l’information le plus efficacement possible.

Rodon, Thierry

Breakout 4D: Finding and Measuring Wellbeing
Wed. Nov. 15: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Breakout 3D: LCAC $2.5M Partnership Grant: Priorities for Research
Wed. Nov. 15: 10:45am – 12:15pm

Serson, Scott

Co-chair, Indigenous Advisory Council, Institute on Governance, Senior Associate

Plenary: Modern Treaty Implementation Review Commission (MTIRC)
Wed. Nov. 15: 3:15 – 3:45pm

Scott Serson is a retired federal Deputy Minister. He spent much of his career working on policy related to First Peoples, including Assistant Secretary to the Cabinet, Office of Aboriginal Constitutional Affairs (1985-1987), Deputy Secretary to the Cabinet, Intergovernmental and Aboriginal Affairs (1989), and Deputy Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development (1995-1999). During Scott’s time with DIAND he was instrumental in the development of the Government’s response to the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples. He also provided leadership in the final stage of the creation of Nunavut.  He retired from public service in 2003 following four years as the President of the Public Service Commission of Canada (PSC).

After retiring, Scott served as a policy advisor to the National Chief of the Assembly of First Nations Phil Fontaine for five years. During that time he helped conceptualize and negotiate the Kelowna Accord. He also served for nine years on the Board of the Institute on Governance, including two years as Chair. He continues to volunteer for the Institute in the area of Indigenous Governance and to co-Chair their Indigenous Advisory Circle.  Scott continues as a member of the Board of Canadians for a New Partnership.

Schultz, Ed

Breakout 1C: Building From a Cultural Foundation
Tues. Nov. 14: 1:15 – 2:25pm

Schwartz, RisaRisa Schwartz

Breakout 2C: International Relations
Tues. Nov. 14: 3:15 – 4:45pm

Risa Schwartz is a sole practitioner, focusing on international law and the intersections between trade law, environmental law and Indigenous rights.  Risa was formerly a senior research fellow with CIGI’s International Law Research Program. In that role, she researched law and policy that supported increasing Indigenous peoples’ participation in international law and treaty making.  Risa has also held positions as counsel to the Ministry of Aboriginal Affairs in Ontario, and the Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change, and worked as a legal officer at the World Trade Organization in Geneva, Switzerland.  Risa obtained her LL.B. from Osgoode Hall Law School and her LL.M. from the London School of Economics.

Sheldon, Melaina

Breakout 2A: Communicating and Understanding Modern Treaties: Responsibilities of Generations to Come
Tues. Nov. 14: 3:15 – 4:45pm

Melaina Sheldon is Inland Tlingit of the Deisheetaan (Beaver) Clan from Teslin, Yukon Territory.  Ms. Sheldon is a newly appointed member of the Yukon Police Council and sits as clan representative on the Teslin Tlingit Justice Council where she is playing a key role in the development and implementation of a Peacemaker Court within her First Nation. She is an alumna of the Gordon Foundation’s prestigious Jane Glassco Northern Fellowship where her policy research focused on integrating popular theatre techniques with workshop teachings in a new training initiative focused on crime prevention and breaking stereotypes between First Nation youth and RCMP.  As of August 2017, Ms. Sheldon leads the Jane Glassco Northern Fellows program for the Gordon Foundation and looks forward to promoting policy and leadership development in Canada’s North.

Simic, Jovan

Breakout 4B: Co-management in Nunavut – unique challenges and opportunities
Wed. Nov. 15: 1:15 – 12:45pm
Jovan Simic has been intrigued by the north and Inuit way of living ever since he immigrated to Canada in 1993. A chance opportunity to work in Algonquin Provincial Park as a student has made him fall in love with Canadian protected areas. Today, as Park Manager for Qausuittuq National Park, Jovan is looking to combine his appreciation for Inuit culture with his passion for protected areas, by working on further developing cooperatively managed model for the park that includes Inuit knowledge and governance in order to protect local interests and those of all Canadians for generations to come.

Simpson, Bob

Breakout 2D: Data: Needs, Uses, Tools, Technologies
Tues. Nov. 14: 3:15 – 4:45pm

Breakout 3D: LCAC $2.5M Partnership Grant: Priorities for Research
Wed. Nov. 15: 10:45am – 12:15pm

A resident of the north for the past 35 years, Bob Simpson lived in a number of different settings, urban Yellowknife, Inuvik and smaller communities – Fort McPherson, Tsiigehtchic and Sachs Harbour. His work has also taken him to all of the communities in the Northwest Territories. This gave him a unique understanding of northern communities.

Mr. Simpson’s work experience is generally in the area of community development, including economic development, small business operations, community and aboriginal government administrator. As a land claim and self-government negotiator and resource management consultant Mr. Simpson was required to obtain and facilitate decision making at the community, regional and territorial level.

In the area of community development work Mr. Simpson has extensive experience in working with various social and education groups in the community and region. Mr. Simpson served as Chairperson on the Beaufort-Delta Education Council for three terms and was a Town Councilor in Inuvik.

His particular interest in the negotiations of Aboriginal rights agreements goes back to the early 1980s. Working at a territorial level Mr. Simpson assisted in the development of resource management systems during Devolution and land claim negotiations and as a Gwich’in representative to the health devolution. As a negotiator for the Gwich’in Tribal Council, Mr. Simpson’s primary responsibilities were the resource management, implementation and self-government provisions of the Gwich’in Comprehensive Land Claim Agreement. After the completion of the Gwich’in Agreement he was instrumental in the drafting of the Mackenzie Valley Resource Management Act and subsequent establishment of the Act’s public co-management boards.

Mr. Simpson currently resides in Inuvik and is the Inuvialuit Self-government negotiator and involved in negotiations of a Devolution and Resource Revenue Sharing Agreement. Although Mr. Simpson efforts are mainly focused on negotiations he still enjoys community work.

Smith, Mark F.

General Counsel/Director of Process

B.C. Treaty Commission

Breakout 1D: Roles of Research
Tues. Nov. 14: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Mark Smith is General Counsel and Director of Process for the BC Treaty Commission. He provides legal, political, and strategic policy advice on a wide-range of Indigenous land claims and Aboriginal rights issues.

Mark leads complex multi-party facilitations, including overlapping and shared territory issues amongst First Nations, and other dispute resolution processes. He works directly with First Nations on governance, Nation-building, and capacity building initiatives. Mark is also involved in work at the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues.

A graduate from the University of Alberta Law School, Mark was called to Alberta Bar, and is currently a member of the Law Society in British Columbia. Mark has focused his career on Aboriginal law and First Nations issues.

Statnyk, Kris

Kris Statnyk

Associate
Mandell Pinder LLP

Plenary: Indigenous Laws, Ways and Values: Transforming Canada
Wed. Nov. 15: 9:00 – 10:15am

Breakout 2C: International Relations
Tues. Nov. 14: 3:15 – 4:45pm

Kris is a Citizen of the Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation from the Gwich’in community of Old Crow, Yukon and a lawyer working exclusively with Indigenous peoples and organizations in the area of Aboriginal law at the Vancouver-based law firm Mandell Pinder LLP. Kris assists First Nations in upholding their Aboriginal and Treaty rights whether in the courts, through consultations and negotiations, or on the ground, including advising and providing negotiation support to the Vuntut Gwitchin Government on intergovernmental and implementation matters related to the Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation Final Agreement and Self-Government Agreement.

Prior to practicing law, Kris obtained a Bachelors of Arts degree with a major in Political Science from the University of Alberta and Juris Doctor degree from the University of Victoria, Faculty of Law. While studying law, Kris worked with the University of Victoria’s Indigenous Law Research Unit on a national project in partnership with Indigenous communities across Canada and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission focused on the revitalization of Indigenous legal traditions.

Steinke, Bruno

Breakout 2E: Review of Laws and Policies
Tues. Nov. 14: 3:15 – 4:45pm

Torrance, Jessica

Breakout 2E: Review of Laws and Policies
Tues. Nov. 14: 3:15 – 4:45pm

Jessica started her federal career 12 years ago in Self-Government Policy with INAC, before moving to the Yukon Treaty Management team.  In this capacity, Jessica got a solid grounding in how the treaties work on the ground, and the roles and responsibilities of the Government of Canada in fulfilling the objectives of the treaties.  In 2012, Jessica joined Implementation Policy as a senior advisor.  In this capacity, she played a key role in the development of the Cabinet Directive on the Federal Approach to Modern Treaty Implementation, the creation of the Deputy Ministers’ Oversight Committee and the Modern Treaty Implementation Office (MTIO), and of the Assessment of Modern Treaty Implications requirement.   In 2017, Jessica took on a management role with the newly created MTIO.  Her team’s key responsibilities include coordination of the AMTI process across Government; support and guidance to federal departments on treaties and treaty rights; delivering training to federal officials, and developing policy approaches to address treaty issues.

Tremblay, Jean-Francois

Deputy Minister, Indigenous Services at Government of Canada

Breakout 2B: The INAC Departmental Split: Implications
Tues. Nov. 14: 3:15 – 4:45 pm

 

 

Tseleie, Daniel

Plenary: A New Generation of Leaders Reflects on Implementation
Tues. Nov. 14: 11:15 – 12:00pm

Breakout 2A: Communicating and Understanding Treaties: Responsibilities of Generations to Come
Tues. Nov. 14: 3:15 – 4:45pm

Daniel T’seleie is K’ahsho Got’ine Dene from Radili Ko (also known as Fort Good Hope, Northwest Territories). He is K’ahsho Got’ine Chief Negotiator for Radili Ko’s self-government negotiations, and is also an Associate with Olthuis Kleer Townshend – LLP. Daniel is also a practitioner and trainer in non-violent direct action tactics and strategy, focusing on work with Indigenous communities who are asserting sovereignty and working towards environmental justice.

Uniuqsaraq, Hannah

Breakout 4C: Land Use Planning: Challenges and Opportunities
Wed. Nov. 15: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Hannah Uniuqsaraq is the Director of Policy and Planning at Nunavut Tunngavik Inc. where she works on diverse issues advancing Inuit rights and interests including Land Use Planning.  Prior to joining NTI, Hannah was employed with the Government of Canada for 14 years.  During her tenure, she was a Sr. Economic Development Advisor with the Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency coordinating the Northern Adult Basic Education Program with the three territorial colleges across Canada’s North, and Policy and Planning Advisor for the Department of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada, Nunavut Regional Office.  Her educational background includes political science studies from the University of Manitoba, Adult Basic Education with St. Francis Xavier and the Nunavut Arctic College and selected through a talent management process, completed the completed the Aboriginal Leadership Development Initiative, a leadership program for promising executives through the Canada School for Public Servants.

Veilleux, Daniel

Breakout 3E: Four Federal Legislative Reviews to Watch
Wed. Nov. 15: 10:45am – 12:15pm

A member of the Red Rock First Nation, Daniel attended the Program of Legal Studies for Native People at the University of Saskatchewan prior to attending the University of Ottawa’s Common Law program. He completed his degree with an option in Aboriginal Law and Indigenous Legal Traditions, as well as an option in Environmental Law.

Daniel previously interned with the Specific Claims Tribunal, the Ecojustice Environmental Law Clinic, and Pro Bono Students Canada where he first had the opportunity to work with Cynthia Westaway.

Daniel has recently contributed to the federal reviews of the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, the National Energy Board Act, the Fisheries Act, the Navigation Protection Act, and the Oceans Act. He has also participated in project specific consultations with the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency.

Prior to practicing law, Daniel obtained an Honours BBA from Brock University and spent several years working for various public-sector bodies including the National Research Council, Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada, and Fisheries and Oceans Canada.

In his spare time, Daniel can be found kayaking, running, and playing tennis.

Waddell, Connie

Executive Councillor

Plenary: The Spirit and Intent of Modern Treaties
Tues. Nov. 14: 10:45 – 11:15am

Connie Waddell (nee Nookemis, traditional name Nanaa-aqs) was elected to Huu-ay-aht Executive Council in 2015 and currently responsible for the portfolios of Treaty Implementation, Policy and Law Development, and Employment and Training.

Prior to holding elected office Connie worked with Huu-ay-aht First Nations. She started as Cultural Tourism Manager in April 1999. Connie served as Huu-ay-aht Executive Director from 2000 to 2013.

As Executive Director, Connie provided vital support to Huu-ay-aht during treaty development, ratification and implementation.

Welters, Michael

Michael Welters

Partner
Aldridge + Rosling LLP, Vancouver, BC

Breakout 3A: Lessons Learned from the Collaborative Fiscal Policy Development Process
Wed. Nov. 15: 10:45am – 12:15pm

Michael Welters advises on taxes and inter-governmental fiscal relations. He specializes in providing tax advice to the tax-exempt sector, including modern treaty nations, bands, municipalities, health authorities, pension plans, charities and non-profit organizations. He provides those clients with advice on: obtaining or maintaining their income tax exempt status and structuring new activities; complying with and mitigating their commodity tax obligations (e.g., PST, GST, property transfer tax); and the application of, or exemption from, annual property taxes. He teaches “aboriginal tax” as an adjunct professor at UBC Faculty of Law.

With respect to the inter-governmental fiscal relations, Michael advises on the negotiation of tax coordination agreements between different levels of government and on the negotiation and application of fiscal financing and own source revenue agreements. His knowledge extends to equalization and territorial financing arrangements and provincial tax harmonization arrangements.

Michael has represented clients in a variety of tax disputes, both at the administrative and court appeal levels, with respect to a wide range of taxes, including income tax, carbon tax, PST, GST, EI and CPP, tobacco tax and property tax. He has also assisted clients who have outstanding tax obligations with making voluntary disclosures to tax authorities.

White, Mitchell

Breakout 2D: Data: Needs, Uses, Tools, Technologies
Tues. Nov. 14: 3:15 – 4:45pm

Wilkinson, Joanne

Plenary: Deputy Ministers Q&A: Implementing Modern Treaties and the Work of Reconciliation
Wed. Nov. 15: 8:40 – 9:30am

Since February 2017, Ms. Joanne Wilkinson has been the Assistant Secretary for the Review of Laws and Policies related to Indigenous Peoples at the Privy Council Office (PCO) and is also the PCO’s Indigenous Peoples Champion.

In more than 25 years in the public service, she has worked in a wide range of areas, covering policy development and program management at a national level, including preparations for the social policy aspects of several federal Budgets; operational priorities like First Nation infrastructure and emergency and lands management practices, including expenditure reviews and labour-management consultations.

She previously held the positions of Director of Operations in PCO’s Social Development Policy Secretariat, as well as Director General of Education and Regional Director General for Yukon and Ontario Regions with Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada.

Ms. Wilkinson holds a certificate in Public Sector Leadership and Governance as well as a Bachelor of Arts degree with honours in translation from the University of Ottawa.

Winger, Susan

Breakout 3E: Four Federal Legislative Reviews to Watch
Wed. Nov. 15: 10:45am – 12:15pm

Susan Winger joined the Agency in September 2016 as Special Advisor, Indigenous Affairs, to the Vice-President, Policy Development Sector. She is responsible for Indigenous policy in environmental assessment.

Prior to joining the Agency, Susan worked for more than 20 years with Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada, most recently as Partnerships Manager, Consultation and Accommodation Unit. She holds a Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in History from the University of Waterloo.

Wright, David

Breakout 3B: The Peel River Case: Implementation Through Litigation
Wed. Nov. 15: 10:45 – 12:15pm

Plenary: Modern Treaty Implementation Review Commission (MTIRC)
Wed. Nov. 15: 3:15 – 3:45pm

David Wright is General Counsel with the Gwich’in Tribal Council (GTC), based in Inuvik, NWT. He oversees all GTC legal affairs, including legal and intergovernmental dimensions of land claim implementation. He holds a JD from the Schulich School of Law at Dalhousie and an LLM from Stanford University. Prior to joining the GTC, David held roles with Canada’s Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development in Ottawa, the United Nations Development Programme in the Maldives, the Government of Nunavut in Iqaluit, and the law firm of Stewart McKelvey in Halifax. David has lived in all three territories across the North, and currently enjoys exploring the Mackenzie Delta and northern Yukon with his with his wife and two young sons.

RECEPTION PERFORMERS

Reception: Evening Reception, Entertainment and Networking Event
Tuesday, November 14, 2017
7:00pm – 8:30pm

Theland Kicknosway is Wolf Clan, is Potawatami and Cree Indigenous youth and is a member of Walpole Island in Southern Ontario. He is 14 years old, a singer, a grass & hoop dancer, and helps in ceremonies in many places. He goes to High School in the Ottawa Region and is in Grade 9 where he is a part of sports teams. He enjoys offering his gifts of song/dance/voice for all. He has completed his 3rd year of running in partnership with Families of Sisters in Spirit from the Ottawa region to the Kitigan Zibi- 134km- raising awareness to the children left behind of MMIW- his 4 yrs running is at the end of March 2018. Theland has been a Blanket Exercise Facilitator -A teaching tool to share the historic and contemporary relationship between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in Canada for the past 4 yrs. He is a helper within the pow wow circle, at many ceremonies and singer/dancer. He is also known as the Cree Drummer that drummed in the new liberal cabinet in 2015.

 

Elaine Kicknosway is Wolf Clan, originally from Northern Saskatchewan, and a member of Peter Ballantyne Cree Nation. she is a survivor of the 60’s scoop era and returned home in the mid 1990’s back to her community. She is a singer, women’s traditional dancer, participant in ceremonies and ongoing learner. Elaine supports and helps within drumming circles, ceremonies, talking circles, discussion related to intergenerational impacts of residential school and how child welfare has impacted the family today. she has been within ceremony life since returning home in her 20’s.

 

 

Nunavut Sivuniksavut

Nunavut Sivuniksavut is a unique college located in Ottawa, where beneficiaries of the Nunavut Land Claims Agreement learn and focus on Inuit Studies.  These bright group of Inuit youth are great advocates for their culture and leaders of the future.  Their performance includes choral singing, group dancing from the Western Arctic, throat singing, drum dancing, a sharing of their history, culture and language through education as well as a demonstration of Inuit Games.