Modern Treaties and Reconciliation Conference 2020 – Speakers List and Bios

Kluane Adamek

Breakout 1A: Teaching our Citizens about the Treaties
Tues. Feb 11: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Kluane Adamek has experience living in rural, urban, northern and southern communities. She is a citizen of the Kluane First Nation and from the Dakl’aweidi- Killer Whale Clan and she loves dancing with the Dakhká Khwáan Dancers, an Inland Tlingit Dance group.  Kluane comes from a diverse background- Indigenous and non-Indigenous- she believes this has given her the ability to view and analyze our world from different perspectives. She has a BA from Carleton, fluent in French and English, and is currently pursuing her MBA in Aboriginal Business and Leadership at Simon Fraser University.

Kluane’s professional experience includes work with the Yukon College Board of Governors and Kluane Dana Shaw Corporation; leading education initiatives at the Council of Yukon First Nations; building partnerships with Indigenous communities and all levels of Government for Northwestel; and most notably serving as an advisor to former Assembly of First Nations National Chief Shawn A-in-chut Atleo.

Recently, Kluane served as a Senior Advisor for the Yukon Territorial, Hon. Pauline Frost, Minister of Health and Social Services, Environment and Housing. Kluane was a Global Shapers with the World Economic Forum and in 2014 chosen as one of 23 ‘Bold Visionaries’ from across the country for the 2014 Bold Vision Leadership Conference.  Kluane is incredibly passionate about supporting youth and emerging leaders in the north and beyond and through her Northern Fellowship she founded and led the development of “Our Voices”, a collective of northern Indigenous emerging leaders and continues to serve as the Co-Chair of exciting new initiative.

P.J. Akeeagok

Breakout: 3C Building Sustainable Economies
Wed. Feb. 12: 10:45 – 12:00pm

P.J. Akeeagok was elected as the President of the Qikiqtani Inuit Association in December 2014 for his first term and re-elected in December 2018. As QIA President, Akeeagok has initiated numerous new projects and programs in Qikiqtani. Recently, he negotiated a successful Inuit Impact Benefit Agreement for Tallurutiup Imanga National Marine Conservation Area, and other companion agreements for interim protection of Tuvaijuittuq Marine Protected Area, these areas encompass Canada’s largest bodies of protected waters. Akeeagok also recently secured an acknowledgement and apology from the Government of Canada for the colonial policies and practices imposed on Qikiqtani Inuit from 1950 to 1975. The apology was accompanied with an initial investment and a Memorandum of Understanding for additional funds in the future to address healing, cultural awareness and preservation initiatives.

Originally from Canada’s most northern community, Grise Fiord, Akeeagok has devoted his professional career to representing Inuit in Nunavut. Prior to becoming QIA’s president, Akeeagok served in numerous roles with Inuit organizations, including as assistant executive director and as a community liaison officer at QIA, assistant director of communications for Nunavut Tunngavik Inc. and as a project coordinator at Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami.

Math’ieya Alatini

Master of Ceremonies

Breakout: 4A Sustaining Indigenous Languages
Wed. Feb. 12: 10:45 – 12:00pm

Math’ieya Alatini’s name is synonymous with energy, action and integrity. She’s a capable and experienced leader, known for trailblazing and her no-nonsense approach to getting results. On the heels of two very productive terms serving as Chief of Kluane First Nation, Math’ieya did a quick pit stop working with the Yukon Government Cabinet office and is now bringing her experience and energy to her work for Canada’s Indigenous Governments and Northern communities as the Chief Strategist for GSD Strategies.

She is of Southern Tutchone, Tlingit, Russian and Welsh descent and therefore has extensive family and community connections in Yukon and globally! Math’ieya was fortunate to experience both a traditional Indigenous lifestyle and a modern way of living which has given strong foundations to all her endeavours.  The traditional values and “ways of knowing and doing” is also shared by her husband, Tevita, and thereby has been transferred to their two children. Together they ensure their children have the same opportunities for growth and discovery of all cultures and yet are grounded in knowing where they come from.

Math’ieya holds a Bachelor of Commerce from the University of Victoria and has experience in many sectors and in different capacities from Tourism to a Non-Profit Volunteer organizations that specialized in First Nation capacity building.  With the Federal Department of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) in British Columbia she was responsible for managing a diverse portfolio of capital infrastructure and green energy projects in excess of $400 million for up to 43 different First Nation communities.

Under Math’ieya’s leadership as Kluane First Nation Chief, she guided the nation towards energy self-sufficiency and economic resilience in the small community of Burwash Landing. This was done through the ability to forge partnerships with industry, other Yukon First Nations, Yukon Government and several Federal Departments.   Her demonstrated ability to leverage opportunities, facilitate collaborative partnerships to create economic, social and environmental benefits position her as an established leader and game-changer with the credibility of a proven track record.

Building relationships and sharing knowledge is a strong motivator for her.  Through her company GSD Strategies, Math’ieya brings her ability to skillfully guide partnerships, create collaborative successes in order to launch big picture initiatives and deliver tangible results for her clients.  Her work ethic and vision has earned her a reputation as a leader who can get things done in a good way.

Paul Bachand

Paul Bachand

Breakout 2E: Legal and Policy Updates
Tues. Feb 11: 3:15 – 4:45pm

Paul Bachand specializes in Indigenous rights, governance and land law. Paul has more than 25 years’ experience providing service to clients across Canada, particularly in the North. In addition to the negotiating of land claim and self government agreements, Paul’s background and experience allow him to fulfill his passion for implementing Indigenous land and self government agreements, advising on land, land registry, governance and legal issues facing First Nations as they exercise their law-making jurisdiction and land administration. Paul has appeared as litigation counsel before a wide variety of administrative tribunals, courts and courts of appeal.

Paul has extensive experience in issues related to lands and land use planning, and as the former Registrar of Land Titles for NWT he oversaw the implementation and registration of the Nunavut Land Claims Agreement land titles, the Sahtu and Gwich’in land titles and engaged with a variety of issues ranging from registration of survey plans to Land Titles Office protocols and implementation of land claim agreements. Paul is also the former Principal Secretary to two premiers of the Northwest Territories and the former Director of the Legal Division for the Government of the Northwest Territories. Paul assisted in the design, development, consultation process and then implementation of the Tlicho Wene’ke – The Tlicho Land Use Plan.

Among the many matters that he has worked on during his career, Paul was legal counsel on the division of the NWT and Nunavut; lead counsel on the Salt River Treaty Land Entitlement Agreement which saw Salt River First Nation in Fort Smith obtain a cash and land settlement, as well as the creation of reserve lands in the community of Fort Smith NWT; lead counsel on a number of land claim and self-government negotiations with a specific focus on lands and governance issues and interaction with land titles office; and Paul played—and continues to play—a key role in the implementation for the Tlicho Government of its Tlicho Final Agreement.

Paul is currently providing legal advice to Nunavut Tunngavik Inc. on devolution issues. Paul has also been involved in the development and implementation of several impact and benefits agreements, been counsel on a number of environmental reviews of mining projects, and, as a partner with Pape Salter Teillet LLP, was integral in developing one of the most advanced First Nation Government Land Use Plans in Canada, on behalf of the Tlicho Government.

Paul received his LL.B from Dalhousie University and is called to the bars of the Northwest Territories, Yukon, British Columbia and Nunavut.

Dougald Brown

Breakout 3E: Resolving Basic Differences: Dispute Resolution, Litigation and Other Options
Wed. Feb. 12: 10:45 – 12:00pm

 

 

 

Kirk Cameron

Kirk Cameron

Breakout 3D: A Modern Treaty Implementation Review Commission
Wed. Feb. 12: 10:45 – 12:00pm

Kirk Cameron is from Whitehorse, Yukon and has worked throughout his career in the area of governance including the creation of Nunavut, Yukon Devolution, Land Claims and Self-government.

During his two decades in public service, Kirk held positions in the Government of Yukon, Province of British Columbia and Canada’s Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development focusing on policy, planning and legislative development.  While with DIAND, he worked on creation of the new Nunavut Territory and other northern governance topics. His public service career culminated in his appointment as a Yukon Deputy Minister (Executive Council Office/Cabinet Secretary, and Environment).  During his time with the ECO, he oversaw Devolution of land and resources administration to Yukon from Canada, the rewrite of the Yukon’s Constitution (the Yukon Act) and the settlement of a number of outstanding land claims. In addition, in 2011 Kirk was elected to Whitehorse City Council where he served two terms.  Since June 2016 Kirk has been the federal appointee to the Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Board. In 2003, Kirk moved to the private sector as a governance consultant. During his time as a consultant, Kirk has provided services to most Yukon First Nations, and Indigenous governments/corporations in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut.  He has also advised the Land Claims Agreements Coalition representing those Indigenous groups throughout Canada with Modern Treaties.

Ronnie Campbell

Breakout 3D: A Modern Treaty Implementation Review Commission
Wed. Feb. 12: 10:45 – 12:00pm

Ronnie Campbell is a retired Assistant Auditor General of Canada.

Following his arrival in Canada from Scotland in 1976, he worked for the Hudson’s Bay Company in Inuit communities in the eastern Arctic and Cree communities in the James Bay.

He joined the Office of the Auditor General of Canada in 1981 and retired in 2015.  He spent much of his time designing and leading Performance Audits, many of which were focused on programs directed at Indigenous populations both south of 60, and in the 3 territories.

Mr. Campbell has a Commerce Degree from Ottawa University and is a CPA.

Bobby Clark

Breakout 1A: Teaching our Citizens about the Treaties
Tues. Feb 11: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Bobby is currently the Director of Communications and Intergovernmental Relations with Nisga’a Lisims Government. Bobby currently serves as Chair for the Nisg̱a’a Museum Advisory Committee and is a board member representing his home community of Lax̱g̱alts’ap on the Wilp Wilx̱o’oskwhl Nisg̱a’a Institute (WWNI).

Equally matched has been Bobby’s focus on post-secondary education: after graduating from Nisga’a Elementary Secondary School in 1999 he attended Capilano University and the University of Ottawa. In 2014, Bobby graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in First Nations Studies from WWNI and the University of Northern British Columbia.

Matthew Coon-Come

Mathew Coon Come

Plenary 6: Language and Culture – The Foundation for the Future
Wed. Feb. 12: 4:15 – 4:45pm

Matthew Coon Come was born in 1957 in a bush tent on his father’s trap line in Northern Quebec.  He attended a residential school, and studied at Trent and McGill Universities.  His political career began at the age of 16 when he attended the meeting of his community’s elders to discuss Phase One of the James Bay Project.  Since that time, he has emerged as one of the most significant leaders of the Cree Communities of Northern Quebec.  Under his leadership, the Cree have initiated research into resource management, the environmental impacts of hydro-electric development, energy economics and political economy.  He oversaw the Cree’s role at the United Nations to draft a Universal Declaration of the Right of Indigenous Peoples.  During the Meech Lake and Charlottetown Accord discussions, he made significant contribution to the negotiations on constitutional amendments that would have guaranteed Aboriginal and treaty rights in Canada.  Despite the subsequent failures of the accords, Matthew’s contributions raised standards regarding the rights of indigenous peoples in Canada.

He is known as a negotiator and leader who has signed agreements with the government of Canada to build infrastructure improvements in Cree communities.  He is best known for his work opposing the Great Whale Hydro Electric Project in Quebec, where he showed tenacity of purpose and clarity of vision by insisting on a full, comprehensive and public assessment.  This tenacity led to the Quebec Government’s decision to cancel the project.  Mathew is known nationally and internationally for his environmental work and the leadership of the Cree people of Northern Quebec.

Frank Dragon

Breakout 2B: What Should Co-Development Look Like? Modern Treaty Perspectives
Tues. Feb 11: 3:15 – 4:45pm

 

 

Leena Evic

Plenary 4: For a Better Tomorrow
Wed. Feb. 12: 9:30 – 10:15am

Leena Evic has been an essential voice in Nunavut, articulating a vision for the territory that is grounded fully in Inuit knowledge and wisdom that have been passed along through the centuries. She works to rekindle the sharing of this living legacy between generations of Inuit as the means to building prosperity and wellbeing in the modern Arctic communities of today.

Leena Evic is the founder and President of the Pirurvik Centre, an Inuit-owned company dedicated to Inuit language, culture and wellbeing.  In 2016, she was awarded the Meritorious Service Cross by Canada’s Governor General in recognition of the transformative programs Pirurvik has created since 2003. Pirurvik wide range of programming explores the highest levels of Inuit knowledge; provides literacy and language enhancement to Inuktut speakers and teaches Inuktut as a Second language to younger Inuit and those from outside the culture. Its well-being programs are designed around the specific needs of Inuit men, women and youth. Pirurvik has also been on the leading edge of creating the computing tools that enable Inuktut speakers to use their language in the digital age.  As Pirurvik’s President, but also as an educator, a facilitator and an entrepreneur, Leena shares her experience and inspiration through speaking events in local communities, throughout Nunavut and the rest of Canada, and on the global stage.

Before beginning Pirurvik, Leena was the Director of Social, Cultural and Educational Development with Nunavut Tunngavik, the Inuit organization that signed Canada’s largest land claims agreement.  She was also the Director of Policy for the Department of Justice in the Government of Nunavut that was created in 1999 as part of the land claim.

Inuit approaches to teaching and learning have been important throughout this time, beginning in her early years when she was immersed in the rhythms of traditional Inuit life in Cumberland Sound, near present-day Pangnirtung.  She has built on that foundation through a career as a teacher, a school principal and as an instructor in the Nunavut Teacher Education Program.  She holds a Bachelor’s in Education from McGill University where she also did her Master’s work on educational leadership and culture-based education.

Dave Joe

Plenary 1: History, Diversity, Implications, and Benefits: An Insider’s Overview of Land Claims Agreements
Tues. Feb 11: 9:00 – 10:20am

Dave Joe is a citizen of Champagne and Aishihik First Nations. He is a distinguished lawyer who was called to the bar in 1977 in the Yukon and in 1999 in British Columbia. Dave has worked as chief negotiator for the Council of Yukon First Nations and a number of Canadian First Nations. He still acts as legal advisor for Yukon, British Columbia, and Northwest Territories First Nations.

Hayden King

Breakout 1D: Implementation Organizations: Committees & Co-management Boards
Tues. Feb 11: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Hayden King is Anishinaabe from Beausoleil First Nation on Gchi’mnissing in Huronia, Ontario. The Executive Director of Yellowhead Institute and Advisor to the Dean of Arts on Indigenous Education at Ryerson University, Dr. King is also an adjunct professor at Carleton University and senior fellow at Massey College. Previously he has taught at McMaster University and the First Nations Technical Institute and has also served as senior advisor to the Ontario government, Director of Research at the Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business, and scholar-in-residence at the Conference Board of Canada.

Dr. King is among the noted Indigenous public intellectuals in Canada with his analysis on the Canadian-Indigenous relationship appearing widely.

Serge Lariviere

Breakout 4C: Food Security
Wed. Feb. 12: 10:45 – 12:00pm

 

 

 

Sashia Leung

Breakout 1A: Teaching our Citizens about the Treaties
Tues. Feb 11: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Sashia Leung is proud to be both Wet’suwet’en and Chinese, from Wiset (Moricetown), BC. She is a strong advocate for the rights of Indigenous peoples and has focused her academic and professional work on advancing reconciliation and nation-building. Sashia holds a BA in Political Science with a concentration in First Nations studies from the University of British Columbia.

Sashia is Associate Director of Process for the BC Treaty Commission. She facilitates treaty negotiations, organizes forums, and leads special projects including: First Nations governance initiatives, ratification processes, communications, and community engagement. Sashia also assists with nation-to-nation engagement on First Nations overlap and shared territory discussions. Sashia has worked at the international level for the past four years at the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Rights, supporting the UNPFII Expert Members.

Sashia is a 2017 member of the Governor General’s Canadian Leadership Conference and serves on the Executive Board for the Nicola Valley Institute of Technology and on the Big Brothers Greater Vancouver Charity Board.

Mike Joyce

Breakout 4B: Revenues, Financial Relationships & Modern Treaty Implementation
Wed. Feb. 12: 10:45 – 12:00pm

Mike Joyce first came to the School of Policy Studies in 1995 on a two-year interchange from the Canadian federal government’s Treasury Board Secretariat.  In addition to his other duties as an adjunct professor, Mike served a three-year term (2009 to 2012) as the MPA Program Director. At the School, Mike teaches courses on government expenditure management and budgeting and for a number of years was a co-instructor for that program’s core course, Management in the Public Sector.

From 1981 to 2005, starting as a program analyst, Mike held various positions in the federal government’s Treasury Board Secretariat.  In his final position as Senior Assistant Secretary responsible for the Secretariat’s Expenditure Management Sector, Mike was directly responsible for the budget office role played by the Treasury Board Secretariat and he played a lead role in developing and implementing a number of the Secretariat’s expenditure management initiatives. As well, he served as the Secretariat’s representative on the OECD’s Senior Budget Officers Working Group. His previous experience in the Secretariat included three years as Director of Estimates and, before that, as a Program Sector Director in a number of different positions covering Citizenship, Immigration, Justice, Cultural, Aboriginal and Crown corporation portfolios.  Before joining the Treasury Board Secretariat, Mike worked for the Atomic Energy Control Board on regulatory policy.

Ross Pattee

Assistant Deputy Minister, CIRNAC

Breakout 4D: The 2015 Cabinet Directive: Reflections after 5 years
Wed. Feb. 12: 10:45 – 12:00pm

 

 

 

Jordan Peterson

Breakout 2A: Involving Youth, Recruitment and Succession Planning
Tues. Feb 11: 3:15 – 4:45pm

Plenary 4: For a Better Tomorrow
Wed. Feb. 12: 9:30 – 10:15am

Jordan Peterson is the elected Deputy Grand Chief/Vice President of the Gwich’in Tribal Council (GTC). The Gwich’in Tribal Council was established through negotiations of the Gwich’in Comprehensive Land Claim Agreement in 1992.

Jordan was elected in June 2016 for a four year term and serves on the Board of Directors for the GTC, Gwich’in Settlement Corporation and Gwich’in Council International. His portfolios are diverse and range from Intergovernmental Relations to Gwich’in services. He is the political lead and Chief Negotiator for the GTC Self-Government process and a range of Intergovernmental Affairs.

Bertha Rabesca Zoe

Breakout 1B: Self-Government
Tues. Feb 11: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Bertha Rabesca Zoe is a Tlicho Citizen from Behchoko, Northwest Territories and speaks Tlicho fluently. She is married to John B. Zoe and they have four adult children and six grandchildren. Bertha is sole practitioner and legal counsel to the Tlicho Government. Bertha studied Native Studies and Political Science at University of Alberta and received her Law Degree from the University of Alberta Law School in April 2003. Bertha is a member of the Law Society of Northwest Territories.

Bertha assisted in the negotiation of the Tlicho Agreement Implementation Plan and was lead counsel on the negotiation and implementation of the Northwest Territories Lands and Resources Devolution Agreement on behalf of the Tlicho Government. Bertha currently serves as the Laws Guardian for the Tlicho Government, the Tlicho Agreement Implementation Committee, the Secretariat to the Leaders Council (Devolution) and on the Technical Working Group of the Land Claims Agreement Coalition. Bertha served on the Mackenzie Valley Environmental Impact Review Board from 1997 – 2003.

Margaret Rosling

Breakout 2C: Impact & Benefit Agreements
Tues. Feb 11: 3:15 – 4:45pm

 

 

Colin Salter

Breakout 3B: Collaborative Federal Fiscal Policy Development Process
Wed. Feb. 12: 10:45 – 12:00pm

Colin Salter is a partner with Pape Salter Teillet LLP and specializes in Indigenous rights law, with a focus on the fiscal and business opportunities available to Indigenous peoples that build wealth and economic independence. As a member of the legal team that worked with the Dogrib Treaty 11 Council and the Tlicho people to negotiate the Tlicho Land Claims and Self-Government Agreement, Colin helped conclude the first agreement of this kind in the Northwest Territories in 2004. His focus during the negotiations was on the fiscal and tax aspects of the agreement. He also participated in the negotiation of tax sharing agreements for both the Income Tax and Goods and Services Tax, including appearances before parliamentary committees to advocate on behalf of the sharing of taxes with Indigenous governments.

Colin also has significant experience negotiating and concluding agreements with corporations that propose developments in Indigenous homelands. Colin has assisted his clients in arranging financing for their equity participation in the projects. He has worked to guarantee Indigenous governments’ significant participation in the business opportunities that arise from a development project.

Colin received his LL.B from Osgoode Hall Law School and is called to the bar in Ontario, Yukon and the Northwest Territories. Colin is recognized as a “repeatedly recommended” leading practitioner in the field of Aboriginal law in the peer rankings published by Lexpert Magazine.

David Wright

Breakout 3E: Resolving Basic Differences: Dispute Resolution, Litigation and Other Options
Wed. Feb. 12: 10:45 – 12:00pm

Breakout 4D: The 2015 Cabinet Directive: Reflections after 5 years
Wed. Feb. 12: 10:45 – 12:00pm

John B Zoe

Breakout 4A: Sustaining Indigenous Languages
Wed. Feb. 12: 10:45 – 12:00pm

Dr. John B. Zoe was the Chief Land Claims Negotiator for the former Treaty 11 Council of the NWT from 1992 until its conclusion with the establishment of the Tłı̨chǫ Government in 2005. John is now a senior advisor to the Tłı̨chǫ Government. He has an Honourary Doctor of Laws from the University of Alberta in recognition of his work in the development of the new government, as well as his contributions to involving elders and youth in projects that are built upon a foundation of Tłı̨chǫ language, culture and way of life. His own publications include articles on Dogrib ethno-archaeology and place names, Dogrib sacred sites, and the history of settlement types and traditional architecture.

John is the Community Advisor for the Tłįchǫ region with the NWT On The Land Collaborative, bringing invaluable experiences developing and supporting land-based programs in Tłįchǫ N’de. He played a pivotal role in the creation and ongoing success of Wha Dǫ Ehtǫ K’è (Trails of Our Ancestors), an annual canoe trip that keeps Tłįchǫ history and culture alive by retracing traditional routes.

John was elected as a Fellow of the Arctic Institute of North America in 1997.