National Conference 2023 – Speakers List and Bios

Jason AkearokJason Akearok

Executive Director, Nunavut Wildlife Management Board

Breakout 1A: Is Co-management Working?

Tues. Feb. 28: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Jason Akearok as an Inuk from Sanirajak, Nunavut. He is the Executive Director for the Nunavut Wildlife Management Board (NWMB). Mr. Akearok has extensive academic and working experience in wildlife research, wildlife management and using Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit in wildlife decision-making.

Jason has a Master’s of Science degree where he examined the biochemical markers from High arctic nesting marine birds to determine their food web structure. Mr. Akearok has worked as a biologist for the Canadian Wildlife Service where he assisted and participated in marine bird research. In that role, he worked with local and regional organizations to gather Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit on marine birds and climate change and this research was instrumental in the listing of marine birds under Canada’s federal Species at Risk Act legislation.

At the NWMB, Mr. Akearok collaborates on wildlife issues that are important to Inuit. The NWMB is formed under a modern treaty between Canada and Nunavut Inuit. One of the primary aims of the NWMB is to use Inuit Knowledge in wildlife decision. To achieve this aim, Mr. Akearok and his team collaborate with Inuit, Nunavut communities, government and other stakeholders to use Inuit Knowledge. The NWMB, under Mr. Akearok’s leadership continues to seek innovative ways of enhancing Inuit knowledge.

Jim AldridgeJim Aldridge, K.C.

Partner, Aldridge + Rosling

Plenary 2: Intro to Implementation Issues
Tues. Feb. 28: 11:00 – 11:45am

Breakout 2E: Updates on Jurisprudence and Legislative Development
Tues. Feb. 28: 3:15 – 4:45pm

Mr. Aldridge is a member of the British Columbia Bar and has been an adjunct professor at the Faculty of Law, University of British Columbia. He represented the Nisga’a Nation in treaty negotiations since 1980, was lead counsel during most of that time and continues to act for Nisga’a Lisims Government. He was a member of the legal team representing the Manitoba Métis Federation in its action in respect of Métis land rights under the Manitoba Act and is now assisting with negotiations related to those rights.Mr. Aldridge represents a number of other clients in the areas of Indigenous, constitutional and administrative law.

PitaPita Aatami Aatami

President, Makivik Corporation

Plenary 1: Looking Back, Looking Forward

Tues. Feb. 28: 9:10 – 10:20am

Mr. Pita Aatami was elected President of Makivik Corporation in January 2021. He previously held the position from 1998-2012. From 2013-2020 he was the President and CEO of Air Inuit, a wholly owned Makivik Corporation subsidiary.

His history with Makivik Corporation goes back to 1987 when he was elected Board Member for the community of Kuujjuaq, where he grew up. In 1993 he was elected Treasurer of Makivik Corporation, a position he held until becoming President in 1998.

Mr. Aatami was previously Chairman of First Air, President of Kuujjuamiut, Halutik Enterprises, and Director of Air Inuit, and Seaku Fisheries. He is past President of the Nayumivik Landholding Corporation in Kuujjuaq, and was the Deputy Mayor of Kuujjuaq for ten years, as well as the past president of the Kuujjuaq Recreation Committee. He started the Kuujjuaq Youth Camp in his community.

LisaLisa Badenhorst Badenhorst

Masters Student, UiT – The Arctic University of Norway

Breakout 4E: Current Research Projects

Wed. March 1: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Lisa is in her final year of a master’s programme in Indigenous Studies at UiT. Her research focuses on collaboration amongst self-governing First Nations in the Yukon.Since 2015, she has worked closely with self-governing First Nations in the Yukon, including working for the Kluane First Nation as the Governance Director for five years. The Modern Treaties Implementation Research Project (MTIRP) is supporting her research.

Jody BeaumontJody Beaumont

Implementation Manager, Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in Government

Breakout 3C: Case-studies in Mining, Oil and Gas
Wed. March 1: 10:45 – 12:00pm

Breakout 4B: Developing and Implementing Laws and Policies
Wed. March 1: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Jody has lived and worked on Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in lands for decades now, following a post-university road trip to Dawson City, Yukon. What was meant to be a short summer adventure before heading off to higher academic studies quickly became a lifetime commitment to people and to place. Jody was offered a position in Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in’s Government shortly after the signing of our treaty and is honoured to be a part of the growth of the Tr’ondëk community. It is a powerful thing to participate in the re-establishment of self-determined Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in society and to be welcomed into the Dënezhu world, a world so clearly shaped by and best suited to these lands.

Jody worked for many years in Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in Government’s Heritage Department and was fortunate to spend time with our Elders and knowledge keepers, as well as with Elders and knowledge keepers from all over the north. The knowledge, philosophy, perspectives, and ways of being that live in the people of this place, and that are so generously shared, are lifechanging, and, without a doubt, the most meaningful education one could hope to have.

Jody now works in Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in’s Implementation Department and speaks on behalf of the community, ensuring that our treaty is understood and brought to life in ways that honour Tr’ëhudè – living in a good way – and that reflect the Dënezhu world.

Karen Bouchard

Doctoral student, Université Laval

Breakout 4E: Current Research Projects
Topic: Mind the Gap: Comparative Statistical Analysis of Indigenous Communities with and without Modern Treaties in Quebec

Wed. March 1: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Karen Bouchard is a doctoral student in political science at Université Laval. Her research, entitled “Can Modern Treaties Reverse the Resource Curse? A Case Study on the Effects of the Nunavut Land Claims Agreement on Mining and Inuit Socioeconomic Development”, examines how the institutions established through Modern Treaties may enhance the positive effects and mitigate the negative repercussions of mining in Nunavut. Her research is part of the Modern Treaties Implementation Research Project co-directed by Thierry Rodon, Professor of Political Science at Université Laval, and Alastair Campbell, Senior Policy Advisor at Nunavut Tunngavik Inc, the Nunavut Inuit land claim organization. Her PhD also contributes to the Knowledge Network on Mining Encounters and Indigenous Sustainable Livelihoods: Cross-Perspectives from the Circumpolar North and Melanesia/Australia (MinErAL Network). Karen has additionally collaborated on research projects with the Nisga’a Lisims Government on the impact of Modern Treaties on indigenous well-being.

Karen is a recipient of a Joseph-Armand Bombardier Canada Graduate Scholarship (SSHRC), the doctoral scholarship of the Chaire de recherche Sentinelle Nord sur les relations avec les sociétés Inuitand Northern Scientific Training Program awards. She works part-time as a research analyst in the Strategic Research and Data Innovation Branch at the Departments of Indigenous Services and Crown-Aboriginal Relations and Northern Affairs Canada.

Kirk Cameron

Kirk Cameron

President, Northern Governance Institute

Breakout 1D: Implementation Policy and Initiatives

Tues. Feb 28: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Kirk Cameron is from Whitehorse, Yukon and has worked on key projects in the North including the creation of Nunavut, Yukon Devolution, and Land Claims and Self-government implementation. Following two decades in management positions in Yukon, British Columbia and with the federal government, his public service career culminated in the post of Deputy Minister of Yukon’s Executive Council Office. In 2003, Kirk moved to the private sector as a governance consultant. He has provided services to all Yukon First Nations, and Indigenous governments/corporations in the Northwest Territories, Nunavut and northern BC. He has also advised the Land Claims Agreements Coalition on Modern Treaties implementation. Since June 2016 Kirk has been the federal appointment to the Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Board. From 2011 through 2015 Kirk was elected to Whitehorse City Council, and re-elected to the post in 2021 for another 3 year term. In July 2019 Kirk was appointed by Ministerial Order as a Justice of the Peace in Yukon, but resigned the post so that he could serve once again on City Council. Kirk has had the privilege over the past 15 years of Chairing General Assemblies and Joint Clan Meetings for most Yukon and northern BC First Nations.

Alastair Campbell

Alastair Campbell

Senior Policy Advisor, Nunavut Tunngavik Incorporated (NTI)

Breakout 1D: Implementation Policy and Initiatives
Tues. Feb. 28: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Alastair Campbell is Senior Planning and Policy Advisor to Nunavut Tunngavik, the organization that represents Nunavut Inuit. He has previously worked for the Government of the NWT, the federal government, and the Assembly of First Nations. He has studied history and the social sciences at universities in Canada, New Zealand and Europe, and he has taught occasional courses in Indigenous Studies, Anthropology and Sociology. He has published papers dealing with northern political development and land claims agreements.

Vivien Carli

Program Director, Gordon Foundation

Breakout 4A: Modern Treaty Education

Wed. March 1: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Vivien is the Program Director at The Gordon Foundation. Her role is to support the Foundation’s northern and treaties programming and develop partnerships and collaboration opportunities that maximize reach and impact of the Foundation. Vivien has assisted First Nations and Inuit organizations, Canadian and international non-profit organizations, the United Nations, and governments around the world to be successful and sustainable, set up new organizations, restructure programs, develop policy, conduct research and evaluate initiatives. She is passionate about having a positive impact in this world and teaching her son Lucas about the importance of caring for nature and all beings.

Vivien is a graduate of McGill University where she completed an honours Master’s degree in Sociology and an honours Bachelor of Arts in Economics and International Development Studies.

Mary Childs

Mary Childs

General Counsel, Tsawwassen First Nation

Breakout 2B: Taxation and the Section 87 Tax Exemption
Tues. Feb. 28: 3:15 – 4:45pm

Breakout 4B: Developing and Implementing Laws and Policies
Wed. March 1: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Mary Childs is General Counsel for Tsawwassen First Nation. She has degrees from Carleton, UBC, and Oxford. Before joining TFN in June 2020, she practiced with a national law firm, working primarily with charities, cooperatives, and other purpose-driven organizations. Mary has held academic positions in law faculties in Canada and the UK; she has published on a variety of legal topics. She chairs the board of governors of the Law Foundation of British Columbia, is a member of BC’s Passenger Transportation Board, and sits on the Motor Dealer Customer Compensation Fund Board. In both 2021 and 2022 Mary was named one of BC’s 500 most influential business leaders by Business In Vancouver.

Glenn Cousins

Glenn Cousins

Manager, Partnerships and Planning, Kakivak Association

Breakout 4C: Government Contracting and Economic Opportunities
Wed. March 1: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Glenn Cousins has been with Kakivak Association for over 14 years. For a number of years he was the Manager of Business Services, and in this capacity was involved in hundreds of small and micro-business development projects. For the past three years Glenn has taken on the role of Manager, Partnerships & Planning, providing leadership and support in a variety of program areas.

Glenn first came to Nunavut in 1986 and after 20 years in the private sector he changed careers to become more involved in economic development, spending three years as the Executive Director of the Nunavut Economic Forum before joining Kakivak Association.

Glenn grew up in northern British Columbia, and has lived in, or visited a number of communities in both Nunavut and Nunavik, but has called Iqaluit home for almost 25 years. He is married with three adult children.

Glenn spent a number of years volunteering as the Board Chair of Habitat for Humanity Iqaluit, contributing to the construction of five homes. He is a recipient of the 2005-2006 Pride and Recognition Award for Interdepartmental Collaboration and Working Relationships presented by the Deputy Minister of Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, was named a Paul Harris Fellow by the Iqaluit Rotary Club, and was awarded the 2017 Nunavut Trade Show Business Person of the Year.

Adamie Delisle-Alaku

Adamie Delisle-Alaku

Vice-President, Resource Development, Makivik

Breakout 2A: Protecting Caribou and Salmon
Tues. Feb. 28: 3:15 – 4:45pm

Mr. Adamie Delisle-Alaku was born on June 28, 1981. He received his high school diploma in 1999 from Ikusik High School in his hometown of Salluit. He then pursued higher education in Pure and Applied Science and Social Science at Marie-Victorin College in Montreal from 1999 to 2002. After his studies in post-secondary, Adamie worked at the Raglan mine for Kiewit Nuvumiut, first as the human resources coordinator for seven years and thereafter served as a general open-pit foreman for three years. Prior to being employed at Makivik Corporation, Adamie was manager at the Salluit FCNQ Co-op hotel, served as a volunteer fireman and equally was an active first responder for 7 years over this period.

Adamie joined Makivik Corporation in early spring of 2011 in the capacity of Executive Assistant to Mr. Johnny Peters. In this position he developed a broad understanding of wildlife issues and the various challenges related to renewable resources facing the Inuit of Nunavik. He has showed great devotion in ensuring that Nunavimmiut were heard and well represented at a Regional, National and International level. He currently is a member of the Hunting Fishing Trapping Coordinating Committee where he has been active for the past four years. He is equally co-chair of the Ungava Peninsula Caribou Aboriginal Roundtable and involved in the fresh water seal recovery strategy team.

As Executive Vice President responsible for the Renewable Resource Department, his duties also include sitting on various Makivik subsidiary and joint venture companies. These include Air Inuit Ltd, Bradley Air Services (better known as First Air), Nunavik Creations Inc., Halutik Enterprises Inc., Nunavik Geomatics Inc., Nunacell Inc. and Kautaq Construction Inc.

Adamie is a respected member of his home community of Salluit but now lives in Kuujjuaq with his partner Victoria and her 2 children Linus and Louise. Amongst many of his achievements Adamie is fluently tri-lingual (Inuktitut, French and English) and is an accomplished musician.

In his elected capacity at Makivik, Adamie is committed to ensuring he will represent Nunavimiut’s best interests regarding their cultural ties to the land and Nunavik’s renewable resources.

Sidey Deska-GauthierSidey Deska-Gauthier

Breakout 4E: Current Research Projects
Topic: “Spirit and Intent” in Modern Treaty Implementation: Measuring Economic Success and Treaty Objectives

Wed. March 1: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Sidey is a community-driver researcher and consultant with a background in modern treaty implementation, community economic development, and socio-economic assessment and monitoring. Sidey has a MA in Political Science, has lived and worked in Yukon for 5 years, and is dedicated to supporting the self-determination of First Nation communities and governments. Sidey is currently a collaborator on a national study aimed at understanding and learning from the multi-stakeholder experiences within the Independent Assessment Process – a compensatory element of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreements.

Leena EvicLeena Evic

President, Pirurvik Centre Inc.

Plenary 5: This is Who We Are
Wed. March 1: 3:15 – 4:15pm

Breakout 1F: Strengthening Indigenous Languages
Tues. Feb. 28: 1:15-2:45pm

Leena Evic has been an essential voice in Nunavut, articulating a vision for the territory that is grounded fully in Inuit knowledge and wisdom that have been passed along through the centuries. She works to rekindle the sharing of this living legacy between generations of Inuit as the means to building prosperity and wellbeing in the modern Arctic communities of today.

Leena Evic is the founder and President of the Pirurvik Centre, an Inuit-owned company dedicated to Inuit language, culture and wellbeing.  In 2016, she was awarded the Meritorious Service Cross by Canada’s Governor General in recognition of the transformative programs Pirurvik has created since 2003. Pirurvik wide range of programming explores the highest levels of Inuit knowledge; provides literacy and language enhancement to Inuktut speakers and teaches Inuktut as a Second language to younger Inuit and those from outside the culture. Its well-being programs are designed around the specific needs of Inuit men, women and youth. Pirurvik has also been on the leading edge of creating the computing tools that enable Inuktut speakers to use their language in the digital age.  As Pirurvik’s President, but also as an educator, a facilitator and an entrepreneur, Leena shares her experience and inspiration through speaking events in local communities, throughout Nunavut and the rest of Canada, and on the global stage.

Before beginning Pirurvik, Leena was the Director of Social, Cultural and Educational Development with Nunavut Tunngavik, the Inuit organization that signed Canada’s largest land claims agreement.  She was also the Director of Policy for the Department of Justice in the Government of Nunavut that was created in 1999 as part of the land claim.

Inuit approaches to teaching and learning have been important throughout this time, beginning in her early years when she was immersed in the rhythms of traditional Inuit life in Cumberland Sound, near present-day Pangnirtung.  She has built on that foundation through a career as a teacher, a school principal and as an instructor in the Nunavut Teacher Education Program.  She holds a Bachelor’s in Education from McGill University where she also did her Master’s work on educational leadership and culture-based education.

Alexander Flaherty

Alexander Flaherty

Owner, Polar Outfitting

Breakout 3F: Art, Crafts, On the Land Skills and Performance as Cultural Practice and Business Opportunity

Wed. March 1: 10:45 – 12:00pm

Alexander (Alex) was raised in Grise Fiord, Nunavut. Grise Fiord, the northernmost community in Nunavut and Canada, is home to some of the most spectacular landscape and a small, hospitable population of less than 200.

Alex’s grandparents, who were relocated from Northern Quebec to the High Arctic in the 1950s, had to adapt and learn how to hunt in harsh conditions. This became a way of life for relocated Inuit in the tightly knit community of Grise Fiord. Growing up hunting and camping with his father and extended family, Alex developed a passion for the outdoors at a very young age.

Alex graduated from Nunavut Arctic College’s Environmental Technology Program in 2008 and began his career in environmental conservation and sustainability. From 2010 to 2018, he worked for the Government of Nunavut’s Department of Environment Division of Fisheries and Sealing, where he taught Nunavummiut valuable land-based skills needed to hunt and fish in the Arctic.

In 2017, Alex started his own business, Polar Outfitting, a company that has maintained 100% Inuit employment since its inception. Polar Outfitting provides Inuit and non-Inuit the opportunity to experience Canada’s Arctic in a rich cultural environment, in English and in Inuktitut, and through the lens of traditional Inuit knowledge.

Whether in small teams or in groups of 100, Alex enjoys working with children and youth, particularly teaching them the hunting skills and land-based literacy necessary to adapt and survive in Nunavut. Polar Outfitting recently partnered with the Ilitaqsiniq Nunavut Literacy Council, where Alex led youth programs to foster traditional Inuit knowledge while teaching youth to hunt, trap and fish as well as sustainable practices of community development.

In Feb 2019, Polar Outfitting won the Top Aboriginal Business of the Year Award at the Arctic Indigenous Investment Conference. In January 2019, Polar Outfitting represented Nunavut at the New York Times Travel Show, which featured nearly 500 exhibitors representing more than 150 countries and gave Alex the opportunity to highlight.

Alex believes in the importance of sharing his knowledge and skills of hunting, fishing and trapping to Inuit and non-Inuit in Nunavut. He also believes that his culturally-relevant and place-based teaching and learning approach – which draws on Inuit traditional knowledge and a lifetime of lived experience in harsh conditions – is key to surviving in the Arctic. Polar Outfitting’s success is due in large part to Alex’s deep sense of pride in his Inuit culture and language, and his keen passion for the beautiful outdoors of Nunavut.

Katie Fraser (Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in)

Natural Resources Policy Advisor

Breakout 3C: Case-studies in Mining, Oil, and Gas

Wed. March 1: 10:45 – 12:00pm

Break out 4B: Developing and Implementing Laws and Policies

Wed. March 1: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Katie holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Environmental Science with a focus in Wildlife Biology from McGill University, and a Master’s degree in Sustainability from the University of Saskatchewan. She has over 10 years of experience working in the field of natural resource management within the Yukon, largely in the realm of environmental monitoring, impact assessment, and land use planning. Katie now holds a position with the Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in Government as a Natural Resources Policy Advisor, in which she is largely responsible for the meaningful implementation of Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in’s Final Agreement provisions related to land and resources. In this role, she works closely with the community and other governments to ensure Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in rights and interests are upheld on the land.

Katie is from Dawson City, Yukon, born and raised on the Traditional Territory of the Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in, where she continues to reside with her family.

Rod Hick

Rod Hick

President and CEO, Atuqtuarvik Corp.

Plenary 4: The Indigenous Economy

Wed. March 1: 9:30 – 10:15am

Rod Hick moved to Rankin Inlet, Nunavut with his family in 2001 to take a job with the Nunavut Implementation Training Committee (NITC). In this position, he worked with the boards and staff of Designated Inuit Organizations and Institutions of Public Government across the territory to implement the articles of the Nunavut Agreement. In 2004, Rod joined Atuqtuarvik Corporation as the Chief Operating Officer. He became the President & CEO of Atuqtuarvik in 2017. Atuqtuarvik Corporation is an Inuit-owned financial institution that has been providing debt and equity financing to Inuit businesses in Nunavut since 2000. It is a self-sustaining company that focuses on the social and economic benefits to communities and Nunavummiut by providing advice and the needed capital to help Inuit businesses succeed.

Rod is a past President of Kataujaq Society, a non-profit organization located in Rankin Inlet that manages a regional safe shelter for women and a daycare. He was also the Vice-Chair of the Rankin Inlet District Education Authority. In addition, Rod served on the Inuit Nunangat Selection Committee for the Arctic Inspiration Prize (AIP), an annual $3 million award that celebrates and grants funding to Northern teams with innovative projects that directly impact Northerners. Recently, he became an Honorary Patron of AIP.

Rod graduated from the University of Regina with a Bachelor of Arts Honours and completed human resource and business programs at the University of Manitoba and Queen’s University. He also earned his Professional Director (Pro. Dir.) designation through the Professional Directors Certification Program.

During his 21 years in Nunavut and his 18 years of experience at Atuqtuarvik Corporation, Rod has gained a comprehensive and practical understanding of Nunavut and the Nunavut marketplace.

Rod is married with three children and three granddaughters, two who are Nunavut Beneficiaries.

Dr. Stephanie Irlbacher-FoxStephanie Irlbacher-Fox, BA, MA, (Alberta) PhD (Cambridge)

Breakout 4E: Current Research Projects
Topic: Researching Modern Treaty Implementation: Considerations for Modern Treaty Governments

Wed. March 1: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Stephanie attended primary and high school in Inuvik, NWT, then went on to earn a BA and MA in Political Science at the University of Alberta, and subsequently earned a PhD from Cambridge University, England. For the past twenty-five years, Stephanie has worked for Indigenous peoples’ governments in the NWT on Modern Treaty and self government negotiations and implementation.

Stephanie led the technical team that established the Délįnę Got’įnę Government, and currently represents NWT modern treaty holder clients in treaty, intergovernmental, and self government finance negotiations. She maintains an active academic research program as the Principal Investigator of the Land Claim Agreements Coalition – Carleton University Modern Treaties Implementation Research Project, funded by the SSHRC and hosted by Tłįchǫ Government. For the past five years she has been the founding Scientific Director of Hotıì ts’eeda, a Canadian Institutes of Health Research-funded research support unit, hosted by the Tłįchǫ Government.

She and her spouse Andrew live in Yellowknife with their two teenage boys.

Crystal Jack

Crystal Jack

Co-founder, Tiithluup Advisory Services

Breakout 3A: The Indigenous Data Governance Toolkit & Tools for Community Well-being

Wed. March 1: 10:45 – 12:00pm

Crystal Jack is a co-founder of Tiithluup Advisory Services, which she owns and operates with her husband John Jack. Tiithluup Advisory Services is a consulting network specializing in governance, communications, and planning with a focus on modern treaty implementation in British Columbia.

Crystal has worked with Huu-ay-aht First Nations and the Maa-nulth Treaty Society in various capacities for 15 years, and is currently the Treaty Implementation Advisor for Huu-ay-aht First Nations. The role is inclusive of treaty implementation and planning internally as well as collaborating with the other Maa-nulth Treat Nations, Maa-nulth Treaty Society, Alliance of British Columbia Modern Treaty Nations, Self-Governing Indigenous Groups, the Land Claims Agreements Coalition, and engagement in intergovernmental relations with local, provincial, and federal governments.

Tiithluup Advisory also engages policy development, data and indicator development and analysis, research and report writing, community engagements, workshops, facilitation, major project relations, fisheries and resources rights, and jurisdiction and law development under An Act Respecting First Nations, Inuit, and Metis, Children, Youth, and Families.

Crystal lives in Parksville, British Columbia with her husband John Jack and their 3 young children. She has a BA in Anthropology from Vancouver Island University.

Johnson Dillon

Dillon Johnson

Consultant, Temixw Planning, Ltd.

Plenary 2: Intro to Implementation Issues
Tues. Feb. 28: 11:00 – 11:45

Breakout 3D: Thorny Issues in Implementation
Wed. March 1: 10:45 – 12:00pm

Dillon is from the Tla’amin Nation, where he is serving his fourth term as an elected leader. He proudly carries a Tla’amin name, toqʷanən (toh-kwon-non), which is the place name of a historical village within Tla’amin territory. He has also been providing community, economic and financial planning advice and services to First Nations governments and organizations for 15 years as a consultant with Temixw Planning Ltd. He is an MBA graduate from the University of Western Ontario and holds the Certified Aboriginal Financial Manager (CAFM) designation from AFOA Canada. He also serves as Vice-Chair for the First Nations Financial Management Board.

Harmony Johnson

Harmony Johnson

Breakout 3A: The Indigenous Data Governance Toolkit and Tools for Community Wellbeing

Wed. March 1: 10:45 – 12:00pm

Harmony Johnson, sɛƛakəs, is of the Tla’amin First Nation. Harmony is the Vice-President-Indigenous Wellness & Reconciliation at Providence Health Care, and operates a consulting business providing strategy, advisory, and project leadership services in Indigenous human rights, governance, data sovereignty, and issues of anti-Indigenous racism and discrimination. She teaches and writes in matters of Indigenous health and human rights, including print and digital books about her grandmother’s life history and Tla’amin teachings.

Lisa Kirbie

Lisa Kirbie

Founder and CEO, Blackbird Strategies

Breakout 3B: Effective Communications and Media Relations

Wed. March 1: 10:45 – 12:00pm

Lisa Kirbie advocates for change, bringing her passion and experience to drive results for our clients. She founded Blackbird Strategies in 2019, determined to do government relations differently. Originally from Canada’s west coast, Lisa relocated to Ontario in 2002 and spent close to a decade working on Parliament Hill, including time working for a federal party leader. She gained experience working for a public sector not-for profit agency before she moved to a communications and government relations firm, where she was the managing partner and led both its federal government relations department and Indigenous practice.

Lisa is an award-winning public relations professional who has had many government relations successes during her career. She is a member of the Canadian Public Relations Society, the Government Relations Institute of Canada, and the International Association of Business Communicators. She is a frequent political commentator on various television and radio news programs.

Most importantly, Lisa is the mother of two grown children and the grandmother of two young grandsons, all of whom she adores.

Ingrid Kritsch

Ingrid Kritsch

Breakout 1B: Best Practices in Modern Treaty Implementation
Topic: Elders Led the Way

Tues. Feb. 28: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Ingrid Kritsch is an anthropologist and has worked with Indigenous people in the Canadian Subarctic since 1977. She was the founding Executive Director of the Gwich’in Social and Cultural Institute from 1993-1998, and Research Director from 1998 to 2019, during which time the institute transitioned into the Gwich’in Tribal Council Department of Culture and Heritage (2016). During her tenure, she managed over 120 research projects and worked alongside GSCI colleagues and Gwich’in Elders to implement the heritage chapters of the Gwich’in Comprehensive Land Claim Agreement and create an extensive oral history and traditional knowledge collection. In 2021, this collection was inscribed in the Canada Memory of the World Register – part of UNESCO’s Memory of the World Program. In recognition of her service, Ingrid was elected an honorary member of the Gwich’in of the Northwest Territories in 2008. Ingrid officially retired in 2019, but still engages in Gwich’in-related projects when invited. https://independent.academia.edu/IngridKritsch

www.gwichin.ca

Ken Kyikavichik

Ken Kyikavichik

Grand Chief, Gwich’in Tribal Council

Breakout 2A: Protecting Caribou and Salmon

Tues. Feb. 28: 3:15 – 4:45pm

Kenny was raised in Inuvik and Teetł’it Zheh (Fort McPherson). His mother is Ellen Smith and his grandparents were Peter and Mary Kyikavichik (Kay) of Teetł’it Zheh. One of Kenny’s great grandparents was Chief Johnny Kyikavichik (Kay) who was a signatory to Treaty 11 for the Gwich’in (Loucheux). He spent a good part of his youth at the Kay family fishing camp at Rotten Eye which is located on the Husky Channel just down river from Teetł’it Zheh.

Kenny was most recently the Manager of Corporate Affairs for the global mining company, BHP, in Saskatoon. He worked for BHP for almost 9 years in the roles of Community Manager and Senior Advisor for Aboriginal Economic Development for the Jansen Potash Project in Saskatchewan. Prior to BHP, Kenny worked for De Beers Canada in Yellowknife for almost 7 years in Manager and Superintendent roles for the Snap Lake and Gahcho Kue Diamond Mines. He has been a Director for the Yellowknife Chamber of Commerce and Northern Aboriginal Business Association and has also participated on the Indigenous Affairs Committee for the Mining Association of Canada.

Kenny is a member of the Teetł’it​ Gwich’in First Nation (Fort McPherson) and has served on the Gwich’in Settlement Corporation for 4 years between 2016 and 2020 in the roles of Chair and Vice Chair. He holds a Bachelor of Management (Accounting/Finance) from the University of Lethbridge. Kenny currently resides in Inuvik and is married to his wife Tara, has three children – Alexander, Madison and Riley, and is a Jijii (Grandfather) to three grandchildren – Everett, Jonah and Stellan. He enjoys traveling, watching hockey, playing music and golf.

Jackson Lafferty

Jackson Lafferty

Grand Chief, Tłı̨chǫ Nation

Plenary 6: Building Together

Wed. March 1: 4:15 – 4:45pm

Grand Chief Jackson Lafferty was elected Grand Chief of the Tłı̨chǫ Nation in November 2021. Prior to being elected as Tłı̨chǫ Grand Chief, he served in the Legislature of the Government of the Northwest for five consecutive terms, a period of over 16 years. As MLA for the riding of Mǫwhì, he served as the Deputy Premier, Minister of Education, Culture and Employment (ECE), Justice, Public Works and Services, Official Languages and Worker’s Safety and Compensation Commission.

During his time with the NWT Government and throughout his career, Grand Chief Lafferty served on numerous boards and agencies, where he was a fierce advocate for education, youth, languages, and culture. He was often seen speaking his Tłı̨chǫ language at the legislature during question period.

In the early 2000s, Mr. Lafferty worked in the mining industry with Rio Tinto at the Diavik Diamond Mine. During this time, he contributed to the implementation of DDMI’s Participation Agreement with northern indigenous groups and played a key role as liaison for communities and indigenous mining employees. Grand Chief Lafferty remains committed to working with the mining industry from closure to remediation, work that will be conducted through collaborative consultation.

The Honourable Marc Miller

Minister, Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada

Ballroom Presentation

Tues. Feb. 28: 12:30 – 1:15pm

The Honourable Marc Miller was first elected in 2015 as the Member of Parliament for Ville-Marie—Le Sud-Ouest—Île-des-Sœurs, in Montréal. He has previously served as Minister of Indigenous Services.

Before entering politics, Minister Miller was a practising lawyer. He specialized in mergers and acquisitions, with a focus on international and commercial law, and worked in Montréal, Stockholm, and New York City. Previously, he served as an infantry soldier in the Canadian Armed Forces.

Minister Miller made history in 2017 when he delivered a statement in the House of Commons entirely in Mohawk, marking the first time the language had been spoken in either the House of Commons or Senate since Confederation. He has also been a forceful advocate for increased federal investment in affordable housing, public transit, and the Canada Child Benefit.

Minister Miller has been involved in several charitable and pro bono legal initiatives. He has also authored articles on constitutional and human rights law.

Minister Miller is a graduate of the Université de Montréal, where he earned Master’s and Bachelor’s degrees in Political Science. He also graduated from McGill University with degrees in Common Law and Civil Law.

Minister Miller was born and raised in Montréal.

Andy Moorhouse

Andy MoorhouseVice-President, Makivik Corporation – Economic Development

Plenary 4: The Indigenous Economy

Wed. March 1: 10:45 – 12:00pm

Mr. Moorhouse is an accomplished Inuk beneficiary of the James Bay Northern Quebec Land Claims Agreement, born in Montreal October 9, 1979. He grew up in the Northern Village of Inukjuak, where he completed high school. He was first elected at age 20 in 1999 as a Councillor for the municipality of Inukjuak.

Mr. Moorhouse is serving his second term as Vice-President responsible for Economic Development at Makivik Corporation. This is his fourth term as Makivik Executive – he was first elected as the Corporate Secretary in 2010 and served two terms in this capacity and served his first term as VP of Economic development from 2016 to 2019.

Mr. Moorhouse is currently appointed as a member of Natural Resources Canada’s (NRCAN) Indigenous Off-Diesel Initiative (IODI) Review Panel, a program that distributes a $30 million envelope to Indigenous communities across Canada for Alternative Energy projects. Additionally, Mr. Moorhouse is one of two Inuit appointees to the National Indigenous Economic Board of Directors, appointed by the Federal Minister of Indigenous Affairs.

Before being elected as Makivik’s Corporate Secretary, Mr. Moorhouse worked as the Corporation’s Economic Development Officer as well as the Coordinator for the Ungaluk program, which is jointly administered by Makivik and the Kativik Regional Government to fund culturally appropriate programs geared toward crime prevention for safe and healthy communities.

From 2007-2010, Mr. Moorhouse was President of the Kativik Municipal Housing Bureau; elected Speaker of the Council of the Kativik Regional Government; elected Member of the Nunavik Regional Board of Health and Social Services where he was also a member of the Executive Committee.

Including his first term as an elected council member of the Municipality of Inukjuak in 1999, Mr. Moorhouse was elected Councillor for the Northern Village of Inukjuak in 2001, 2007 and 2009. From 2003-2005 he was Mayor of the Northern Village of Inukjuak. In 2003, he was also elected Treasurer of the Kativik Municipal Housing Bureau. From 1999-2003 he was President of the Saputiit Youth Association of Nunavik.

Mr. Moorhouse resides in Inukjuak, Nunavik. He spends as much of his free time with his children and grandchildren on the land hunting, camping, and fishing throughout the year and teaches his children and grandchildren Inuit traditions. Andy is a strong advocate of preserving and promoting the Inuktitut language, mental health issues, and youth development.

Charles Morven

Secretary Treasurer – Executive, Nisga’a Lisims Government

Plenary 4: The Indigenous Economy
Wed. March 1: 9:30 – 10:15am

Breakout 3C: Case Studies in Mining, Oil and Gas
Wed. March 1: 10:45 – 12:00pm

Charles Morven is Secretary Treasurer of Nisga’a Lisims Government, a member of the Nisga’a Nation and belongs to Wilps Axdii Wil Luugooda and Ksim Xsaan. Charles currently holds the Nisga’a name, Daaxheet. Secretary Treasurer Morven originates from the community of Gitlaxt’aamiks. Charles holds the responsibility chairing both Nisga’a Finance Committee and Nisga’a Capital Finance Committee. Secretary Treasurer Morven also oversees and works with the Management of the Nisga’a Settlement Trust.

Secretary Treasurer Morven has a Bachelor of Arts Degree in First Nations Studies through UNBC and a certificate in Advanced Management attained through the UBC Sauder’s School of Business. A future educational goal for Charles is to obtain a Masters in Business Administration.

Charles also served as Council Representative for the Northwest on the First Nations Health Council (FNHC) from 2012-2016. Charles had the responsibilities while on the FNHC as chairperson for the Northwest Regional Table, Partnership Table with Northern Health Authority and the Policy Committee.

Secretary Treasurer Morven currently resides in the community of Gitwinksihlkw, the home of beautiful wife Nicole Morven. Charles and Nicole have one daughter Peyton Azak-Morven.

Kris Mullaly

Kris Mullaly

Project Manager, Inuit Training Initiatives, Qikiqtani Inuit Association

Breakout 1C: Community-based Employment and Training Projects

Tues. Feb. 28: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Kris Mullaly is the Project Manager for Inuit training Initiatives at Qikiqtani Inuit Association (QIA). The focus of this division is to support the QIA strategy of increasing opportunities for training, skills development and certification of qualifications that empower and prepare Inuit for current and future employment needs in all Qikiqtani Region communities.

Under his leadership, QIA was recently awarded multi-year funding for the Qikiqtani Skills and Training for Employment Partnership (Q-STEP). Kris is a Project Management Professional with the Project Management Institute and has a background in public relations, communications, education and training.

Louise Nachet

Louise Nachet

Breakout 4E: Current Research Projects
Topic: Mind the Gap: Comparative Statistical Analysis of Indigenous Communities with and without Modern Treaties in Quebec

Wed. March 1: 1:15-2:45pm

Louise Nachet is a doctoral student in political science at Laval University in Québec. She holds a master’s degree in international relations from Bordeaux’s Institute of Political Sciences. Her research focuses on coalitions between Indigenous and environmental activists on mining extraction in Canada. Particularly interested in the potential and challenges of such alliances, she seeks to further understand the transformative nature of their mobilizations. Her current PhD project is part of an international research network focused on the consequence of extractive industries on Indigenous rights and welfare named Knowledge Network on Mining Encounters and Indigenous Sustainable Livelihoods (MinERAL).

Mark Nelson

Mark Nelson

Fiscal & Implementation Representative
Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation and Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in

Breakout 3A: The Indigenous Data Governance Toolkit and Tools for Community Wellbeing (moderator)
Wed. March 1: 10:45 – 12:00pm

Breakout 4D: Collaborative Fiscal Policy Development Process Update
Wed. March 1: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Mark has provided fiscal and treaty implementation support to LSCFN since 2017 and TH since 2020, including development of the federal fiscal policy on self-government. He also helps facilitate community-based processes around culture, land, fish and wildlife, and inter-governmental matters. Prior to this, Mark spent eight years working in heritage, lands & resources for two Yukon First Nations governments. Mark has instructed courses in related topics at Yukon University, and helped develop and deliver their First Nations Leadership Program. He currently lives in Whitehorse on Kwanlin Dün and Ta’an Kwach’än traditional territory.

Erin Pauls

Erin Pauls

Breakout 1F: Strengthening Indigenous Languages

Tues. Feb. 28: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Kothetty (Erin Pauls) is a member of the Champagne & Aishihik First Nations (CAFN). Erin currently has the privilege of being the Education Director for CAFN. As Director, Erin oversees education cradle to career. It is an honor to share the language revitalization journey of CAFN; we will be focusing primarily on our Language Nest and Adult Immersion Programs. Erin has worked in Education for 22 years in a variety of areas, in Early Childhood Education, and as an Elementary School teacher. Erin is an elected trustee for the newly formed First Nation School Board in the Yukon. Erin holds a Level 3 in Early Childhood Education, a Bachelors of Education from U of R, and a Masters in Educational Leadership & Management from Royal Roads University. Erin is currently pursing a Doctorate in Education at Simon Fraser University. Education is Erin’s passion and looks forward to learning from all.

Adam Perry

Adam Perry, PhD

Breakout 4E: Current Research Projects
Topic: Sample lessons learned from surveying by one Self-governing Indigenous Government – A pilot project by the Nisga’a Nation

Wed. March 1: 1:15-2:45pm

Adam Perry has a Ph.D. in social anthropology from the University of Fort Hare in South Africa. His work focuses on rural socio-economic development, the co-management of natural resources, biodiversity and questions about what sustainability encompasses. His other interests include focusing on emerging and new economies and human migration, migrant work and social mobility, critical Indigenous theory, and research design. Dr. Perry works with the Nisga’a Lisims Government as an analyst and advisor and regularly consults with several First Nations across Canada, and federal institutions, including local governments in British Columbia.

Jordan Peterson

Jordan Peterson

Affinity North

Plenary 6: Building Together

Wed. Mar. 1: 4:15 – 4:45pm

Jordan Peterson is dedicated to supporting strong, thriving Indigenous communities. Jordan served as the elected Deputy Grand Chief/Vice President and Chief Negotiator of the Gwich’in Tribal Council from August 2016 to September 2020 where he worked every day to advance self-determination and a new relationship with Canada. Jordan was the Strategic Lead for Nation Building at Vuntut Gwitchin Government and was responsible for a broad and complex portfolio including oversight and coordination of implementing the Vuntut Gwitchin Land Claim and Self-Government Agreements.

Jordan has served as a Board member on the Indigenous Peoples Secretariat and as the Senior Arctic Official for Gwich’in Council International (GCI) at the Arctic Council Executive. He was also a Board member and Chair of GCI, one of six permanent participants of the Arctic Council from 2014 to 2020. Jordan currently serves as a board advisor to Northwestel and is a board member of the Na-cho Nyak Dun Development Corporation. Jordan has founded Affinity North; a consultancy focusing on Indigenous issues and is currently focusing on building this business. He continues to advocate for the advancement of Indigenous peoples and specifically Northerners in the business community.

Janna Promislow

Janna Promislow

Associate Professor, University of Victoria, Faculty of Law

Breakout 3E: Modern Treaties and the Law

Wed. Mar. 1: 10:45 – 12:00pm

Dr. Janna Promislow is an Associate Professor at the University of Victoria, Faculty of Law. She is the law theme co-lead on the Modern Treaty Implementation Research Project (SSRCH). Janna’s teaching and research interests encompass constitutional and administrative law, Aboriginal law, treaties, colonial legal history, Indigenous–settler relations, Indigenous law, and legal pluralism. She has published on Aboriginal administrative law, treaty relationships and interpretation, and the historical development of intersocietal law between Indigenous and European fur traders.

Before moving into academia, Janna clerked with the Law Courts of Alberta and practiced law with Davis & Company in the Northwest Territories, where she served Sahtu communities addressing land claims implementation issues and residential schools claims. She also worked as a policy advisor for the Government of Ontario on consultation with Indigenous communities.

Dan Pujdak

Dan Pujdak

Chief Strategy Officer, Blackbird Strategies

Breakout 3B: Effective Communications and Media Relations

Wed. March 1: 10:45 – 12:00pm

Dan Pujdak is a nationally recognized thought leader on reconciliation and Arctic affairs and a leading policy and public relations practitioner. He has worked alongside major Canadian firms in the finance, resource, and retail sectors to build reconciliation initiatives and enhance the reputation of their brands. He has also worked with Indigenous groups across Canada to build partnerships, design policy frameworks, and grow their internal governance and communications capacity.

Previously Dan has served as a senior advisor to Indigenous leaders as well as on Parliament Hill as the Director of Policy to the Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada. He is a Fellow at the Public Policy Forum and Arctic 360, and a Senior Fellow at the Macdonald-Laurier Institute. Dan brings a public relations lens to our work to make sure that audiences understand the value proposition and motivations of our clients.

Nolan Qamanirq

Nolan Qamanirq

Nunavut Sivuniksavut, Stratos/ERM

Breakout 4F: Food Security Initiatives

Wed. March 1: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Nolan is an Inuk student studying at Nunavut Sivuniksavut. He is currently employed by Stratos/ERM as a consultant, working in the natural resources and regulatory regimes. Interests include policy, Indigenous governance, and reconciliation. Nolan will speak to The Gordon Foundation’s Arctic Policy Hackathon policy recommendations on Arctic food sovereignty.

Daniel Quan-Watson

Daniel Quan-Watson

Deputy Minister, Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada

Plenary 2: Intro to Implementation Issues

Tues. Feb. 28: 11:00 – 11:45am

Daniel Quan-Watson is a proud public servant who is passionate about the role that public institutions play in shaping Canada and the lives of Canadians. His appointment at Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada is his fifth appointment as a Deputy Minister, having been Deputy Minister (and previously Associate Deputy Minister) of Western Economic Diversification, Chief Human Resources Officer for the Government of Canada and Chief Executive Officer, Parks Canada.

Much of his career has focused on work with Indigenous peoples and issues, having been the Senior Assistant Deputy Minister for Policy and Strategic Direction at the former Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, Director General of the Aboriginal Justice Directorate at the federal Department of Justice, and Director of Aboriginal and Territorial Relations at INAC’s Northwest Territories Regional Office. With the Government of British Columbia, he was Director of Treaty Implementation and Settlement Legislation where he led the development of the Nisga’a Final Agreement Act (British Columbia) among other major initiatives and, with the Government of Saskatchewan where he was responsible for first negotiations between provincial Department of Education and what was then the Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations.

In the context of these positions, he played key roles in the negotiation of modern treaties, specific claims and many other agreements and processes. He was also the lead for several key legislative initiatives, litigation files and alternative justice programs. He has worked with Inuit, Métis and First Nation governments, communities and entities in every jurisdiction across Canada, and has lived in British Columbia, Alberta, the Northwest Territories, Saskatchewan, Ontario and Quebec.

Beyond this experience, Daniel has significant background in economic development and innovation issues, federal-provincial-territorial relations, labour relations and human resources issues, and cultural and ecological heritage matters. He has represented Canada on numerous issues at forums around the world and has represented the federal government in several national federal-provincial-territorial forums.

Daniel is a pilot, sang for a time with the Regina Philharmonic Choir, has taught firearms safety and hunting courses, and has represented Canada in French, English and Spanish. His record for riding a Harley-Davidson from Ottawa to Edmonton is 46 hours and 10 minutes, one he intends never to repeat or beat.

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Daniel Quan-Watson est fier d’appartenir à la fonction publique et est passionné par le rôle joué par les institutions publiques pour façonner le Canada et la vie des Canadiens et Canadiennes. Sa nomination au sein de Relations Couronne-Autochtones et Affaires du Nord Canada est sa cinquième en tant que sous-ministre, car il a auparavant occupé les postes de sous-ministre (après avoir été sous-ministre délégué) de la Diversification de l’économie de l’Ouest, de dirigeant principal des ressources humaines du gouvernement du Canada ainsi que de directeur général de l’Agence Parcs Canada.

Une grande partie de sa carrière a été axée sur le travail et les enjeux relatifs aux peuples autochtones, que ce soit comme sous-ministre adjoint principal des politiques et de l’orientation stratégique à l’ancien ministère des Affaires indiennes et du Nord (AINC), comme directeur général de la justice applicable aux Autochtones au sein du ministère fédéral de la Justice ou comme directeur des relations autochtones et territoriales au bureau régional des Territoire du Nord-Ouest d’AINC. Au gouvernement de la Colombie-Britannique, il a été directeur de la mise en oeuvre des traités et de la législation sur les accords et à mené des initiatives importantes dont l’établissement de la Loi sur l’Accord définitif nisga’a (Colombie-Britannique). Au gouvernement de la Saskatchewan, il a été responsable des premières négociations entre le ministère provincial de l’Éducation et ce qu’était alors la Fédération des nations indiennes de la Saskatchewan.

Dans le cadre de ces diverses fonctions, il a joué un rôle de premier plan dans la négociation de traités modernes, de revendications particulières et de plusieurs autres ententes et processus. Il a également été responsable de nombreuses initiatives législatives, dossiers de litige et programmes de justice alternative. Il a travaillé avec des communautés, des entités et des gouvernements liés aux Inuits, aux Métis et aux Premières Nations dans des secteurs de compétence partout au Canada, et il a demeuré en Colombie-Britannique, en Alberta, dans les Territoires du Nord-Ouest, en Saskatchewan, en Ontario et au Québec. Daniel a aussi une expérience considérable en matière de développement économique et d’enjeux d’innovation, de grands projets d’infrastructure, de relations fédérales-provinciales-territoriales et de questions relatives aux relations de travail, aux ressources humaines ainsi qu’au patrimoine culturel et écologique. Il a représenté le Canada pour de nombreux enjeux dans des forums aux quatre coins du monde, ainsi que le gouvernement fédéral dans plusieurs forums nationaux et fédéraux-provinciaux-territoriaux.

Daniel est pilote d’avion, a chanté pour la chorale philharmonique de Regina, a donné des cours de chasse et de sécurité dans le maniement des armes à feu et a représenté le Canada en français, en anglais et en espagnol. Son record pour parcourir la distance entre Ottawa et Edmonton en Harley Davidson est de 46 heures et 10 minutes, et il a bien l’intention de ne jamais l’égaler ni le battre.

Thierry Rodon

Thierry Rodon

Breakout 4E: Current Research Projects
Topic: Mind the Gap: Comparative Statistical Analysis of Indigenous Communities with and without Modern Treaties in Quebec

Wed. March 1: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Thierry Rodon is a full professor in the Political Science Department at Université Laval and holds The INQ Research Chair in Northern Sustainable Development and was the director of CIÉRA (Inter-University Centre for Indigenous Studies and Research) from 2014 to 2021. He leads MinErAL, an international research project on extractive industries and Indigenous livelihood, including researchers and Indigenous partners in Canada, Australia, New Caledonia, and Fennoscandia. He is also the co-lead for the well-being theme of the project Modern Treaty Implementation Research: Strengthening Our Shared Future.

In addition to numerous journal articles, he has published three books, In Partnership with the State in 1998 at PUL, Nested Federalism and Inuit Governance in the Canadian Arctic, UBC Press with Gary Wilson and Chris Alcantara in 2020 and Les apories des politiques autochtones au Canada at Presses de l’université du Québec in 2019. As well, he was the editor of, Teach an Eskimo How to Read…, the biography of Peter Itinuar, Canada’s first Inuk MP. He has also provided expertise to the standing committees of the Canadian senate and the house of Commons on indigenous rights and the implementation of the UNDRIP.

Mat SargentMat Sargent

Senior Director, Modern Treaty and Self-Government Implementation Policy Directorate, Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada

Breakout 1D: Implementation Policy and Initiatives
Tues. Feb. 28: 1:15-2:45pm

Mat Sargent is the Senior Director of the Modern Treaty and Self-Government Implementation Policy Directorate at Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada. He is responsible for the development of policy approaches to support the broad and purposive implementation of modern treaties and self-government agreements and working collaboratively with Indigenous partners to advance treaty objectives and renewed relationships.

Mat has spent over 15 years dedicated to advancing the recognition and implementation of Indigenous rights. He has held various positions within the Government of Canada in areas relating to strategic policy, policy co-development, and negotiations. In these capacities, Mat was instrumental in advancing reforms to the Comprehensive Land Claims and Inherent Right to Self-Government policies, including overhauling the federal mandating and approval process for these agreements. In addition, Mat has taken a leadership role in a number of engagement and policy co-development processes with Indigenous partners and other levels of government.

Outside of work, Mat enjoys spending time with his two young children, travelling, and playing soccer.

Jean-Marc SeguinJean-Marc Séguin

Mining Development Manager, Makivik Corporation

Breakout 3C: Case Studies in Mining, Oil and Gas
Wed. March 1: 10:45-12:00pm

Mr. Jean-Marc Séguin graduated from the University of Montreal with a bachelor’s degree in Geology in 1994 and with a master’s degree specializing in structural geology applied to economic resources in 1996. Between 1996 and 2001, he worked as field geologist for Falconbridge Ltd., and with Placer Dome Canada on various exploration campaigns. He has also been involved in research projects, including in Nicaragua, and within geosciences fieldworks/geological surveys with the Ministère des Resources naturelles du Québec.

In 2002, Mr. Séguin joined the Nunavik Mineral Exploration Fund (NMEF), a non-profit organization promoting the mineral resources of Nunavik and involving the Inuit community in mineral development. He went on to work as the NMEF project geologist and, starting in January 2006, became NMEF technical director, managing the organization’s financial resources and projects, such as prospecting training within the Nunavik communities, exploration projects, and Nunavik mineral potential promotional activities.

Since September 2013, Mr. Séguin has been the Mining Coordinator, then Mining Development Manager with Makivvik. He reviews, researches, and analyzes a wide range of mining files and develops policy recommendations related to the mining development of Nunavik. Mr. Séguin also assists Makivvik departments and appointed negotiators on specific negotiations and implementations of the Mining Impacts & Benefits Agreements in Nunavik. At the beginning of his mandate, he also worked on the development of the “Nunavik Inuit Mining Policy,” which launched in November 2014. This resulted from an extensive consultation exercise with the Nunavik communities. The purpose of this policy is to express the favourable conditions for obtaining Nunavik Inuit support for the mining development of their region.

Jean-Marc Séguin is a registered member of the Ordre des Géologues du Québec and of the Association de l’Exploration Minière du Québec.

Daniel SherwinDaniel Sherwin

Breakout 1B: Best Practices in Modern Treaty Implementation
Topic: The Political Development of Modern Treaties

Tues. Feb. 28: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Daniel Sherwin is a settler scholar currently living on Haudenosaunee and Anishinaabe territory. He completed his dissertation on “The Political Development of the Treaty System in Canada” in 2022 at the University of Toronto.  Daniel is currently a postdoctoral fellow with the Modern Treaty Implementation Research Project.

Tammy Steinwand-Deschaumbeault

Tammy Steinwand-Deschaumbeault

Director of Culture and Lands Protection, Tłı̨chǫ Government

Plenary 5: This is Who We Are

Wed. March 1: 3:15 – 4:15pm

Breakout 1F: Strengthening Indigenous Languages

Tues. Feb. 28 1:15 – 2:45pm

Breakout 2F: On the Land Knowledge and Skills

Tues. Feb. 28 3:15 – 4:45pm

Tammy Steinwand-Deschambeault is a Tłı̨chǫ Citizen born and raised in Behchokǫ̀, NT. Tammy graduated from the University of Saskatchewan from the Bachelor of Education Program with great distinction in 1997. Tammy taught in her community for many years before moving to the board office as a Culture and Language Coordinator with the Tłı̨chǫ Community Services Agency. During this time Tammy has had the honor of working with many Tłı̨chǫ Elders to learn the Tłı̨chǫ culture through hands on learning alongside her students and colleagues. Tammy has taken part in four Trails of our Ancestors Canoes trips into each of the Tłı̨chǫ communıtıes. Tammy led the creation a K-Gr.2 immersion program in her community that is still running today. Tammy also assisted the Government of the Northwest Territories with curriculum development in areas of Northern Studies (which included a module on Residential Schools, this work received national recognition) and the new Our Languages Curriculum. Tammy is the Chair for the Official Languages Board of the NWT.

Tammy has received numerous awards for her work including the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal for contribution to her region and the NWT. Presently Tammy is the Director for the Department of Culture and Lands Protection for the Tłı̨chǫ Government. She holds a Masters Degree through the University of Victoria on Indigenous Language Revitalization. Tammy has three daughters and is now a proud grandmother! She lives in Edzo with her husband Frank.

Clarence SynardClarence Synard

President and CEO, NCC Investment Group

Breakout 1C: Community-Based Employment and Training Projects

Tues. Feb. 28: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Breakout 4C: Government Contracting and Economic Opportunities

Wed. March. 1: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Clarence Synard moved to Iqaluit in June of 1995.  In 2005 he started his career with NCC as a project foreman.  In 2010 Clarence was promoted to Construction Manager, VP of Development in 2021, COO in 2014 and the President and CEO in July of 2019.

NCC Investment Group Inc. is 100% Inuit owned and its ownership is shared equally between Qikiqtaaluk Corporation, Sakku Investments Group, Kitikmeot Corporation and Nunasi Corporation.  NCC is a leader in real estate and construction in the territory.

Clarence is also involved in the community where he is part of the following boards:

  • President Baffin Chamber of Commerce
  • Vice President of Skills Nunavut
  • Director QEC
  • Vice Chair Building Advisory committee
  • Habitat for Humanity Iqaluit
  • Canadian Forces Liaison Counsel

In 2018 Clarence was awarded the volunteer of the year award and in 2021 he was awarded the Qikiqtani Business Achievement award as businessperson of the year.

Clarence has two daughters, Haleigh and Marissa, and he enjoys golfing and fishing.

KatieKatie Tucker Tucker

Counsel – Pape Salter Teillet LLP

Breakout 2E: Updates on Jurisprudence and Legislative Development

Tues. Feb. 28: 3:15 – 4:45pm

Katie Tucker advises First Nations and Inuit groups on Indigenous rights law. Over the past 15 years she has worked in private practice, as in-house counsel to an Inuit treaty organization, and for environmental justice non-profit organizations in both Montreal and Toronto. She has worked extensively on historic and modern treaty implementation issues.

Katie represents Indigenous groups in negotiations regarding self-governance, fiscal financing, co-management, commercial and real estate development, land claims, and resolving nuclear waste legacy issues. She has litigated before trial and appellate courts regarding Aboriginal and treaty rights and breaches of the fiduciary duty and honour of the Crown. Katie has been a Sessional Instructor in the Indigenous Studies program at McGill University and has written and presented on the duty to consult and accommodate, Aboriginal rights in relations to International Trade Agreements, and Indigenous Restorative Justice.

She lives in Montreal with her spouse and two children.

Wayne Walsh

Director General, Northern Strategic Policy Branch, Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada

 Breakout 2D: Policy Update Arctic and Northern Policy Framework

Tues. Feb. 28: 3:15 – 4:45pm

Wayne Walsh is the Director General of the Northern Strategic Policy Branch at Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada. With over 20 years’ experience in public administration, Mr. Walsh’s career has allowed him opportunities to forge and develop strong partnerships with Indigenous, provincial, territorial and municipal governments as well as non-profit and industry stakeholders.

Mr. Walsh’s extensive experience in the Government of Canada has covered negotiations, engagement, public policy development, consultation and accommodation and inter-governmental relations, and includes providing executive leadership through the process to co-develop Canada’s Arctic and Northern Policy Framework. Mr. Walsh has a bachelor’s degree in political science and government from Mount Allison University.

Robbie Watt

Robbie Watt

Director, Office of the Commissioner of Indigenous Languages

Breakout 1F: Strengthening Indigenous Languages

Tues. Feb. 28: 1:15 – 2:45pm

As elected President of the Avataq Cultural Institute from 1998 to 2001, Mr. Robert Watt (Robbie) co-created and initiated the commercial production and marketing of Avataq’s five blends of herbal teas. He ensured that all proceeds would be used for the protection and preservation of Inuit Culture and Language., Mr. Watt also facilitated the first ever national gathering of Canadian Inuit throat singers organized by the Avataq Cultural Institute. This event paved the way to the provincial government granting throat singing as a special cultural heritage status in Quebec.

As Co-Director of the Inuit Sub-Commission at the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, Mr. Watt visited numerous Canadian communities, collecting almost 800 statements from residential school and intergenerational trauma survivors. Hearing the hurts and hopes conveyed by these testimonies has increased his own sense of heritage and identity.

More recently, Mr. Watt was President and Commissioner of Kativik Ilisarniliriniq, a school board created under the James Bay Northern Quebec Agreement. In this role, he actively supported initiatives to advance the protection, strengthening and development the Inuktitut language through educational programming rooted in the Inuit identity and worldview.
Lastly, Robbie was just appointed as Director to the new office of the Commissioner of Indigenous Languages of Canada. Robbie has now been residing Ottawa to help set up the new office for the next 5 years.

Michael Welters

Michael Welters

Partner – Aldridge + Rosling LLP

Breakout 2B: Taxation and the Section 87 Tax Exemption

Tues. Feb. 28: 3:15 – 4:45pm

Michael Welters advises Indigenous governments on taxes and inter-governmental fiscal relations. Michael on the negotiation and implementation of tax coordination arrangements between different levels of government and on the negotiation and application of fiscal financing and own source revenue agreements. Michael also brings his extensive background as a corporate commercial tax lawyer to various Indigenous government initiatives.

Michael has represented clients in a variety of tax disputes, both at the administrative and court appeal levels, with respect to a wide range of taxes, including income tax, carbon tax, PST, GST, EI and CPP, tobacco tax and property tax.

Shannon West-Johnson

Shannon West-Johnson

Research Assistant, Nisga’a Lisims Government

Breakout 1B: Best Practices in Modern Treaty Implementation

Tues. Feb. 28: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Shannon West-Johnson holds a Bachelor of Arts in First Nations Studies from Wilp Wilxo’oskwhl Nisga’a Institute (WWNI) and the University of Northern British Columbia (UNBC). Shannon currently works for Nisga’a Lisims Government as a research assistant with the Quality-of-Life Department and has been instrumental in the project success of two province-wide surveying initiatives among Nisga’a Nation members.

David Wright

David Wright

Assistant Professor, University of Calgary, Faculty of Law

Breakout 3E: Modern Treaties and the Law

Wed. Mar. 1, 10:45 – 12:00pm

David is a law professor in the University of Calgary’s Faculty of Law. Prior to his faculty appointment, David was General Counsel with the Gwich’in Tribal Council. He previously held positions with Canada’s Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development, the United Nations Development Programme, the Government of Nunavut, and the law firm of Stewart McKelvey. David has been called to the Bars of Nunavut, Northwest Territories and Nova Scotia, and he holds an MA and JD from Dalhousie University and an LLM from Stanford University. A significant portion of David’s current research is focused on interpretation and implementation of modern treaties and co-management resource regimes in Canada’s North.

John B Zoe

John B Zoe

Senior Advisor, Tłı̨chǫ Government

Plenary 1: Looking Back, Looking Forward
Tues. Feb. 28: 9:10 – 10:20am

Breakout 1B: Best Practices in Modern Treaty Implementation
Topic: Tłı̨chǫ Trails of our Ancestors Canoe Journey
Tues. Feb. 28: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Dr. John B. Zoe was the Chief Land Claims Negotiator for the former Treaty 11 Council of the NWT from 1994 until its conclusion with the establishment of the Tłı̨chǫ Government in 2005. John is now a senior advisor to the Tłı̨chǫ Government, and Chairperson of Hotıì ts’eeda.

He has an Honorary Doctor of Laws from the University of Alberta in recognition of his work in the development of the new government, as well as his contributions to projects that are built upon a foundation of Tłı̨chǫ language, culture and way of life. He is a recipient of the Order of the NWT, is a Fellow of the Arctic Institute of North America, and is Adjunct Professor at the School of Public Health, University of Alberta.

His publications include articles on Tłı̨chǫ ethno-archaeology and place namessacred sites, and the history of settlement types and traditional architecture.

Nicholas Zulu

Nicholas Zulu

PhD Student, Carleton University

Breakout 4E: Current Research Projects
Topic: Researching Modern Treaty Implementation: Considerations for Indigenous Governments

Wed. March 1: 1:15 – 2:45pm

Nicholas is a third-year PhD candidate in the School of Public Policy and Administration at Carleton University. His research focuses on the health and labor market impacts of occupational regulations of allied health professionals. His area of research builds on more than six years of academic and professional experience in health policy and human resources management.

Nicholas has a passion for studying the effects of institutions on human behavior and on growth and development. He previously conducted research in Saskatchewan on the impact of institutional structures on the growth and revenue of credit unions.

Currently, Nicholas is engaged with the Modern Treaties Implementation Research Project (MTIRP) as a part-time research assistant, researching the challenges of the Comprehensive Land Claims Agreement.

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